IN HONOR OF

MY GRANDFATHERS

JOHN “POP” BROMELOW

EDWARD BROMELOW

PAUL WILLIAMS

  John “Pop” Bromelow      Edward Bromelow

This was put together in Honor of John “Pop” Bromelow, my grandpa who was a very sweet man.  One of the best any granddaughter could have.

My memories of seeing him covered in black coal dust, from his head to his feet, as he came home from the coal mine.  I am so blessed that he and his father Edward Bromelow both survived the coal mining jobs that they both were employed in.

Paul Williams

My grandpa Paul Williams was gone before I was born but he also worked in the mines and survived through his time of work in the mines…

Cambridge Herard, 17 Nov 1889 pg. 3 c. 4

Paul Williams, a miner of this place, was caught by a mass of falling coal in Nicholson’s mines, Thursday and sustained dangerous injuries. One leg was broken besides other hurts. Dr. Warne was called.

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Coal

Coal began forming on earth millions of years ago. Carbonization of layers of plant and animal debris results in coal.  After hundreds of years in forming, these layers or seams of coal are separated by layers of dirt and rock.  The weight and pressure of rock and dirt layers contributed to the coal forming process also.  Mineable seams of coal in this country vary in thickness from two feet to more than ninety feet.  Most of the coal in this valley is produced from seams of three to seven feet thick.   Coal is often called black diamonds and black gold.  Diamonds and gold are formed in a manner similar to that of coal, but with much greater pressure involved.  Fern leaf and animal fossils are formed in layers of coal.

Entrance to an underground coal mine is by slope, a gradual or slanting incline to the coal seam; shaft, a vertical opening or deep narrow pit; and drift, a horizontal tunnel.  Drift mining is done in hills and mountains.

In pioneer America, forests were handy and plentiful; and, for a long time, coal was used only in blacksmith shops.  Ohio has large deposits of bituminous or soft coal. Anthracite or hard coal, more firmly pressed, is found in other states.

Coal buried deep in the earth is removed by underground mining. Deaths and crippling accidents are common among miners.  Underground mines have dangerous gases such as carbon monoxide and methane sometimes causing explosions.

In the early days of mining, small towns were built close to a mine.  Mining then was hard, dirty work with picks and shovels.  Machines do most of the heavy jobs in mining today. The coal companies built stores for the miners.  Families could charge their groceries, clothes, tools and household goods.  Prices were high and many families spent their earning before they received them.  Mining companies had a coin of their own called script.  If miners wanted to buy something from other stores, they often borrowed script from the company.

Credit for the Coal story goes to I. A. Ramage

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In all my years in this life, I have always been independent and never afraid to do anything or try things on my own, but I can tell you that I could never go into a mine and do any kind of work…I am not afraid of anything, but one thing for sure, I do not have the nerve to go into any mine, for any reason, so I am really proud of all the men who chose to do the miners’ jobs.  These miners, actually  knowing how dangerous these jobs were, still chose to do them to earn their living.  It is so sad to think that they did not make enough money to live from payday to payday, as the article above on Coal states.

In typing all these injuries and obits I realize just how hard these miners lives had to be.  The lucky ones who made it out of the mine had to have health problems from breathing all that coal dust.  My father drove a coal truck and would come home as black as my grandfather came out of the mine.  My father suffered year after year with asthma and sometimes he would be admitted to the hospital and put in an oxygen tent, just to be able to breathe.   My heart goes out to all miners.

Below you will find the injuries and obits of the miners who were injured or killed while working in the mines.

More coming as I find the obits…

Betty Stillion Shinn

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Jan 1943 pg. 3 c. 4

Miner Killed By Slate Fall While At Work

Arthur Edward Abrams, 27, cousin of Gus Abrams, one of three miners killed on Dec. 28 in a gas blast at McFarland mine of the Byesville Coal Co., died Friday at 8 p.m. at Swan hospital from injuries sustained a few hours earlier in a slate fall at the Buckeye Coal Co. mine, near Dogtown.

Abrams, who resided with his parents Mr. and Mrs. James T. Abrahams, on the Clay Pike near Claysville, was the only man working near the fall of several tons of slate and stone, it was reported.  Death was attributed to a fractured skull.  Several employes were in the mine at the time, it was stated.

The accident occurred shortly after 2 p.m. and Abrams never regained consciousness.  The body was removed to the Herlan Funeral home, Byesville, where it will remain pending completion of funeral arrangements.

Surviving in addition to the parents are seven brothers, Henry, homer, Thomas, Leonard, Jerry and Charles, all of the home and Floyd. U. S. Army and three sisters, Violet Jean, of the home, Mrs. Raymond Brand, New Concord R. D. and Mrs. Bertha McKinley, Byesville R. D.

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The Jeffersonian, 28 Dec 1942 pg. 1 c. 1

Three Men trapped In Mine Blast

Three miners were trapped Monday in McFarland mine of the Byesville Coal Company, near Blue Bell, and rescuers are endeavoring to reach them, it was learned Monday afternoon.

the trapped men were Gus Abrams, Pleasant City R. D. 2; Robert Haugh, Cambridge R. D. 6, and John Sebek, Byesville R. D. 1

Only meager reports were available Monday afternoon, however, it was stated the men were trapped after an explosion of gas in the mine, debris cutting off their escape from the diggings.

State mine inspectors joined with miners in Digging through the rock in a valiant attempt to reach the entombed miners.

There were between 25 and 30 men in the mine at the time, but no one was injured aside from the three men trapped, who were working in the mine section where the blast occurred.

Fear was expressed that the men would not be found alive.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday,  Jun 27, 1901, page 3 c 2

Daniel Ables, a miner employed in the Central Mine at Byesville was caught between the cage and a car Saturday afternoon and so badly injured that he died a few minutes later.  Deceased was about 40 years of age and leaves a wife and two little daughters.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 28 Jan 1909, Pg. 8 C. 3

Holds Inquest Today

Coroner A. W. Ringer held his inquest over the death of Joseph Leroy Aduddle, who was killed in the ideal Mine Monday morning in his office this afternoon.  There were a number of witnesses, and the verdict will not be made known until later.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 18 Jan 1900 Pg. 3 C. 6

Instantly Killed

John Andrews, aged about 55 years employed as a miner in the Walhonding mines, was instantly killed about 8:30 o’clock Friday morning by a fall of slate while at work in the mine.

After the fall of slate his fellow workmen went to work to dig him out but when they reached him he was dead, being instantly killed.  Coroner Voorhies was notified and viewed the remains.  John Andrews was a Hungarian and leaves a wife and family to mourn his death.

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The Jeffersonian, 20 Aug 1908 pg. 3 c. 5

Badly Crushed By Fall Of Slate

John Anker, one of the best known citizens of Guernsey county, who also enjoys the distinction of being the oldest working coal miner in the Guernsey valley, met with a very painful accident this morning while at work in the Kawk’s Nest Coal mine, a small mine recently opened on the Midway mine switch, and sustained injuries which will confine him to his home for some time. The injuries are all the more serious on account of his age, seventy years. A telephone message from Mr. Anker’s home to the Jeffersonian this afternoon stated that his injuries had received careful medical attention and that the patient was resting as well as could be expected.

At the time of the accident Mr. Anker and James Brown, another coal miner, were working in a room when about 8:30 o’clock the men heard a rumbling sound coming from the roof. Mr. Brown who is younger than Mr. Anker, and more active, succeeded in saving himself from injury by jumping to one side, but Mr. Anker was caught and almost buried by the falling slate. As soon as the slate ceased falling Mr. Brown and other miners who were working in the same mine, started to remove the slate from the victim and succeeded in getting him to the mine entrance where a wagon was secured and he was taken to his home on the Byesville street car line, near the Cain Addition. On arriving at the home, they were met by Drs. G. W. Hixon and Fred Lane, who had been called.

An examination showed that his right hip joint had been dislocated his left hip crushed and his left leg fractured between the ankle and knee, and he sustained a very painful cut just above the right eye, extending almost across the forehead. Mr. Anker will be seventy years of age at his next birthday.

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The Jeffersonian, 14 Jul 1917 pg. 1 c. 6

Black Top Miner Killed by Slate

Lore City, July 11, Charles Anton, aged 60 years, employed in the Black Top mine, of the Morris Coal Co., was caught by a fall of slate while at work Friday night and so badly injured that his death followed within two hours after the accident.

He is survived by his wife, one daughter and three sons.  Mrs. Anton and daughter are visiting relatives in St. Louis.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 30 Jul 1903, pg. 3, c. 3

Senecaville

Uriah C. Aplin was killed at the mines here Tuesday evening at about seven o’clock by the bucket striking a timber, knocking off the latch, and upsetting the bucket which was full of slate, about a ton of it, which fell on Mr. Aplin.  The other men got out of the way.  The man on top called as soon as he saw the bucket start to tip. Mr. Aplin was a charter member of the K. Of P. lodge here and was buried by that order. Mr. Aplin was born July 31, 1850, died July 28, 1903, was married to Miss Mary Speer Dec. 12, 1871.  To this union eleven children were born.  Ten still living and all present at the funeral.  Besides the wife and children two sisters are living, Mrs. L. Danford and Mrs. L. Spaid.  The decedent was an honest, upright man as one neighbor expressed “he was true as steel”. Revs. Oliver, Thomas and Ashburn each took part in the services at the house.  The floral tributes were very beautiful.  The family have the sympathy of all.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Nov. 7, 1901 Pg. 2 C 3

Fall of Coal

Kills One Man at Little Pioneer Mines Near Byesville

Wm. Atkinson, a coal miner employed in the Little Pioneer coal mines near Byesville, died about 3 o’clock this morning from the result of injuries received by a fall of coal in that mine Tuesday afternoon at 3:23 o’clock.  Shortly before that time Mr. Atkinson had entered a room by himself and was engaged in taking out coal when without a moment’s warning a large amount of coal, slate and dirt fell, completely burying him.  His cries were heard by fellow workmen who hurried to his assistance and after considerable hard work rescued him from beneath the coal and dirt. The injured man was taken to the Thompson Hotel in Byesville where he has boarded for some time and Drs. Austin and Ringer of Byesville did what they could to relieve his sufferings, but to no avail and he died about 1:30 Tuesday afternoon. Coroner Vorhies was at once notified of the death and as soon as possible viewed the remains.

Deceased was 42 years of age and had been employed in the Little Pioneer mines for some time, boarding during that time at the Thompson Hotel in Byesville where he died.

He was injured about the back by the fall of coal and it was seen at the start that the chances of recovery were very small. Deceased leaves three sisters and two brothers, one of whom lives in Zanesville and was with him at the time of his death. The remains will be taken to Zanesville this evening for interment.

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The Jeffersonian, 6 Oct 1938 pg. 7 c. 6

Young Man Fatally Hurt By Slate Fall

Samuel Morgan Bacon, 21, was instantly killed Wednesday afternoon about 1 o’clock when caught under a fall of slate while working in Fisher mine, near Boden, northwest of Cambridge.

Bacon and his step-father, Samuel McFadyn, were the only persons in the mine at the time and the latter escaped injury. The mine is small, the coal being used to supply families in the Boken community.

McFadyn summoned neighbors and it was some time before the body of the young man was extricated from under the fallen slate.   He was badly crushed about the pelvis and his scalp was torn in several places.

Sheriff Harry Totten, who was called in place of Coroner Ralph M. Nix, who is a patient at Cleveland Clinic, said he believed Bacon’s neck was broken.  He gave a verdict of accidental death.

Bacon had spent the greater part of his life in the Boden community and in addition to his step-father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel McFadyn, he is survived by six half-brothers and half-sisters.  Robert, Delbert, Dollie, Leota, Thomas and Almanda McFadyn, all of the home.  One sister, Mrs. Frances Burdini, West Virginia, also survives.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 16 Jul 1908, Pg. 3 C. 6

August Baer is Dangerously Hurt

Fall of Slate at Midway Mine May Cause Death of Cambridge Man.

August Baer, living in the Fair Ground Addition, and employed as a miner in the Midway Mine, of the Cambridge Colleries Co., was caught by a fall of coal and slate this morning, at 9:30 o’clock, sustaining injuries which may result in death.

At the time of the accident Mr. Baer was working alone in a room.  The fall occurred without warning and the mass crushed him to the floor.  His left shoulder cap was knocked off, his left leg broken and crushed, and a number of ribs on the left side were fractured.  He was also badly injured about his back and hips and his head was painfully cut.

Other men at work near by heard the noise and ran to his assistance, finding him practically buried in the debris.   The work of rescue was started immediately, but it was some time before the men were able to remove the injured man to the entrance of the mine, in the meantime Dr. T. W. Long of Byesville had been summoned and arriving rendered temporary aid.  Bair’s ambulance was called and the victim was brought to this city and removed to Keenan’s hospital.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 23 July 1874

Accident At The Shaft-Enoch Bailey, one of the miners at the coal shaft, a short distance east of town, met with a serious if not fatal accident last Friday while engaged at his occupation.  He was bearing-in (digging under an over-hanging shelf of coal) when a considerable amount fell, crushing Mr. Bailey’s left foot and severely brusing his chest.  The foot has been amputated, and Drs. Wall and Simnons think the chances for recovery good, if there are no internal injuries.   Accidents of this nature have been rather frequent of late at these mines.

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Cambridge Times, 17 Sept 1917 pg. 1 c. 3

Caught in Fall of Slate and badly Injured.

Ed Bair, a driver employed at the Forsythe coal mines, four miles east of Cambridge, was probably fatally injured Saturday night while at work, when a heavy fall of slate broke his back. The fracture is just below the seventh vertebrae.

The injured man was brought to the Cambridge hospital in Eberle & Stevens’ ambulance. It was announced this morning that he was resting as well as could be expected. He is married and has three children.

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The Jeffersonian, 22 Sept 1904 pg. 4 c. 4

Miner Killed

Paul Ballas, a miner living at Pleasant City, and employed in the mines near that place, was caught by a fall of slate early Friday morning sustaining injuries which resulted in his death. Deceased was about twenty-six years of age and had relatives in Braddock, Pa. and Parkersburg, W. Va., from which place he had returned from a visit the day before his death.

The funeral services were held Saturday conducted by Rev. Mr. O. F. Young.  Interment was made in the Pleasant City cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Nov. 8, 1894 Pg. 3 C. 2

George Barnett, the 14 year old boy killed in the Hartford mines, was squeezed to death between two cars.  He was employed as a trapper near the entrance, having to look after the opening and shutting of the doors.  The front car of a train of empties, coming into the mine, got off the track near young Burnett’s position; and he left his doors to assist in putting the car back on the track.  While he was this engaged a loaded train came from the mine and since the boy was not at his post to flag it, before it could be stopped the boy’s life had been crushed out between the first car and one with which he was working.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Jan. 31, 1901 Pg. 3 C. 3

Instantly Killed.

A Heavy Fall of Slate in the Central Mines Near Byesville this Afternoon Instantly Kills George Barnes.

George Barnes, a coal miner aged about 38 years, employed in the Central mines  near Byesville was caught and instantly killed by a heavy fall of slate Thursday afternoon.

At noon deceased, with the other men employed there, entered the mine to complete the day’s work.  Mr. Barnes talked with some of his companions for a few minutes before separating to go to his place of work and after leaving the rest of the men nothing more was heard from him until about 2:30 o’clock when a loud noise was heard from the room in which he and gone to work. All in the mine knew what the sounds meant and hurried in that direction to see what damage had been done. No fears were entertained that Mr. Barnes had been injured by the accident but as he could not be seen or found it gradually dawned on them that he had been caught by the fall. Willing hands went to work at once and soon uncovered the body of Mr. Barnes.

A special received from Byesville to The Jeffersonian at 3:15 o’clock stated that the body had been recovered but had not at that time been removed from the mine.

Mr. Barnes leaves a wife and two children, a son and a daughter,  He was well known in this city and is a brother of Henderson and C. H. Barnes of this place. He was a prominent member of the Byesville K. of P. lodge and an Odd Fellow.

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The Jeffersonian, 19 Aug 1944 pg. 3 c. 6

Walter B. Barnett

Byesville, Aug. 19—Funeral services for Walter B. Barnett, 64, will be conducted Sunday at 2 p.m., at the Herlan Funeral home, by Rev. John Strout, of Trinity Methodist church.  Burial will be made in East Union cemetery, near Claysville.

Mr. Barnett died shortly after being stricken with a heart attack Friday about noon at the Rigby mine where he was engaged as a blacksmith and tipple worker. He had been an employe of the mine for many years and a resident of this community for a number of years. He was a member of the Claysville Methodist church.

Surviving are two sons, Earl, of Fresno, Calif., and Lewis R., of Toledo; two brothers, Charles J., of Zanesville, and Curtis R., Cumberland; two sisters, Mrs. H. P. Moninger, Newark and Mrs. C. W. Burris, of N. Eight St., Cambridge, and three grandchildren.  The body was taken to the Herlan Funeral home where it will remain until after the services.

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Guernsey Times, 8 Jan 1914 pg. 1 c. 1

Basford Died From Injuries

Had His back Broken in October but Survived Until This Morning

Lying with his back broken since last October, suffering continual pain since that time, death came about 3 o’clock Thursday morning to end the mortal pain of Clyde Basford at his home at Lore City.

On Wednesday morning, October 15, Mr. Basford was injured by a fall of slate while at work in Black Top mine. He was immediately removed to the Keenan Hospital, where everything possible was done to relieve his suffering. Later he was taken to Mt. Carmel Hospital, Columbus, but the case was found to be beyond  medical aid. Since that time he has lingered between life and death, bearing his pain with much fortitude.

The deceased was about 38 years of age, son of Mr. and Mrs. James D. Basford, who reside in Senecaville, as do also the following brothers; Ernest, Arthur and Leslie. Another brother, Foreman G., resides in St. Louis, Mo., having just left for that city the forepart of this week, after a visit with his brother, Clyde.

Beside the wife, five children; four boys and one girl, are left to mourn the loss.

The funeral will be held at the Senecaville Methodist church Saturday morning at 10 o’clock, Interment in Senecaville cemetery.

Coroner T. H. Rowles left for Lore City this afternoon to conduct an inquest into the cause of death.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Jan. 20, 1898 Pg. 2 C. 3

Horrible Death!

Frank Beatty Was Caught by a Rope in the Nicholson Mines this Morning and Thrown Against the walls of the Mines, Being Instantly Killed.

Frank Beatty, aged about 16 years, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Beatty, who reside near the Nicholson mines, south of Cambridge, met a horrible death Mon. morning between the hours of 7 and 8 o’clock while performing his duties at the mine.

Young Beatty was employed in the Nicholson mine as an alarm boy and it was his duty to stand at the Shals and see that the loaded cars and ropes or cables attached to the cars were running all right and if anything was wrong to give the signal, by means of an electric bell, to the engineer, who would then stop the engine, which hauled the cars. This morning Beatty, who has been employed at the mines for some time, entered with the others for the purpose of beginning the day’s work. Finding that everything was apparently in first class working order he signaled the engineer to start.  The start was made and the first few cars hauled out when suddenly Beatty was struck by a large shive, which is a wheel around which the ropes or cables attached to the cars run, and was thrown violently against the rib of side of the entrance of the mine, splitting his head and killing him instantly.  One of the miners riding on a car which passed by soon afterward called Beatty and not receiving an answer thought something was wrong and jumping from the car found him lying on the ground.  Help was called and the remains carried to the home of his parents Mr. and Mrs. John Beatty near the mine. Coroner Daugherty was notified and with Constable Gallup viewed the remains this afternoon.   An inquest will probably be held tomorrow.  The funeral took place Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Interment in the Baptist cemetery near Nicholson’s mines.

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Guernsey Times, 14 Feb 1914 pg. 2 c. 2

Forsythe Mines Man Is Killed

Andy Belaca, foreigner, living at Forsythe’s Mine, was run over and killed Saturday at noon by a mine train which was switching, near Mineral Siding.  Taylor and Lyons ambulance was called and the body brought to this city and prepared for burial.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Sept. 15, 1904, Pg. 3 C. 4

Killed in Mine

Frank Bender, for many years an employe of the Blue Bell mine, was caught by a fall of coal while at work in the mine Thursday morning and died about noon as the result of injuries sustained.

Coroner Yeo was notified of the accident and with Constable Gallup went to the mines Friday morning to view the remains.

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Jeffersonian, 25 July 1916 pg. 6 c. 1

Byesville Miner Had Leg Crushed

Byesville, July 25__George Bennett, age 28 years, resident of Fourth street and employed as night boss at Ideal mine, met with a very serious accident last evening at 6 o’clock, when he was ran over by the motor. The left leg was cut off and the body bruised. He was running the motor at the time of the accident and fell in font of it. He crawled the distance of 24 mining cars to a point where he could communicate with Ed Talbott, another night worker, who assisted in getting him out of the mine and called Dr. J. E. Patton who gave fist medical aid. Conner’s ambulance was called and the injured man was taken to the Cambridge hospital where the leg was amputated just above the knee.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, May 15, 1890 Pg. 3 C. 2

A telephone message received from Mathews mines just before going to press announced that John Berkhelmer, son of Henry Berkheimer, of West Cambridge, had been killed by a fall of slate in the entry.  He was about 20 years old and had been engaged as driver for some time.  The mule he drove was also caught and killed.

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The Jeffersonian 6 Jun 1907 pg. 3 c. 3

Imperial Miner Crushed to Death

By the sudden dripping of a great mass of slate, John Bettinger, a coal miner, was instantly crushed to death in the Imperial mines near Belle Valley Wednesday afternoon.  The unfortunate man was working alone in one of the rooms when the accident occurred, but the noise attracted miners working near by who went to him at once.

As a result of the physician’s examination which followed it was ascertained that the mass struck its victim squarely on the head, breaking his neck and otherwise crushing the body in a horrible manner.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 27 Feb 1908, Pg. 3 C. 4

Slate Claims Another Victim

Mike Bichuria is Crushed by Fatally Crushed by Falling Mass in Detroit Mine

Mike Bichuria, a foreigner aged about twenty years, employed in the Detroit mine near Ava, was caught by a heavy fall of coal and slate yesterday at noon and was so badly crushed that he died about an hour after the accident. Deceased was a native of Austria-Hungary and had been employed at the mine for some time.

He was at work with a number of other men in a room of the mine all morning and just before stopping for their noon meal the fatal fall occurred.  The other men were standing at one side at the time and were able to escape, but Bichuria was caught by the full weight of the mass and was terrible crushed about the body and his right leg was broken.

The injured man was taken to his home near the entrance of the mine where he died. Coroner W. B. Yeo was notified of the accident and death and went to the mine yesterday afternoon to view the remains and take testimony, returning home this morning.

Cambridge Jeffersonian, Thursday, Mar. 16, 1905 Pg. 4  C. 2

A slavish coal miner employed in the Old Orchard mines, whose name could not be learned, was very badly injured by a fall of slate while at work in the mines Friday afternoon. Dr. L. C. Wells of this city was called.

(My guess is this obit must be for Andy Birka according to the Miners Killed report.  It states Mar. 10, 1905, same cause of Death and same mine)

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 21 Mar 1907 pg. 1 C. 7

Miner Crushed By Cars.

Frank Bower, of Byesville, a coal miner employed in the Warner mines near that place, was killed Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, by being caught between two cars in the mine.  Coroner Yeo was notified of the death and went to Byesville to view the remains.

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Cambridge Herald, 6 Feb 1890 pg. 3 c. 4

Thomas Boyd, a miner living in West Cambridge, was caught by a mass of falling slate in the Matthews mine south of town Monday, and sustained serious injuries to his hips and spine. Dr. McPherson was called and at last accounts the injured man was getting along as well as could be expected.

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The Jeffersonian Thursday, Nov. 19, 1896 Pg. 3 C. 2

Wm. Bradshaw, of near Byesville, who had his leg crushed last week while at work in a coal mine, and who had the injured leg amputated a few days after the accident, died Sunday. He was not married.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 6 Jun 1907 pg. 4 c. 2

Trail Run Mines Claim A Victim

Jack Brown meets Instant Death Monday Afternoon, Byesville

News Notes

Byesville, June 4. Although Guernsey county mines had no fatalities to report during the month of May, June starts off with a bad record. Jack Brown, an employe of the Little Trail Run mines, met with instant death yesterday afternoon.  He was attempting to fasten a wire to a motor and was electrocuted.  Other employes carried the unfortunate victim to his home in Trail Run, where a wife and four small children are left to mourn their loss.

Mr. Brown was an Englishman by birth, 30 years of age, but came to this vicinity when three years old.  At the Inquest held by Coroner Yeo, the only mark found on his body was located on the left wrist and was about the size of a quarter.

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The Jeffersonian, 26 Nov 1917 pg. 2 c. 6

Miner Was Killed When Caught by a Fall of Slate

William Brown, employed as boss hauler at the Klondyke coal mines, was instantly killed, Sunday at noon when he was caught by a fall of slate. The unfortunate man was at work in the mine, when the slate suddenly fell. He was crushed to death. He is survived by a wife and two small children.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Sept. 18, 1902 Pg. 3 C. 7

Miner Killed

A coal miner by the name of Bundy employed in the Walhonding mines, near Pleasant City, was killed Friday evening. Bundy had just completed his day’s work and was riding towards the mine entrance for a train to go to his home when his head was struck by an overhead he???.   His head was badly mashed and he died shortly afterwards. The funeral was held Sunday.

(According to the Miners killed record this would be C. M. Bundy)

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The Jeffersonian, 30 Jan 1936 pg. 6 c. 1

Fractures Leg In Accident In Mine

J. R. Bundy, 42, Pleasant City, sustained a fractured right leg above the ankle Tuesday afternoon shortly before 2 o’clock, while working in Buffalo mine of the Cambridge Collieries Company. He was removed to Swan hospital where x-ray pictures were made and the fracture reduced. Wednesday Mr. Bundy was reported to be resting comfortable and in a satisfactory condition.

The accident occurred while he was riding out of the mine.  He failed to notice a car standing on the track and his leg became lodged between two cars.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 9 May 1907, Pg. 3 C. 2

Black Top Miner Loses A Finger

Jake Burr, of 7th street, South Cambridge, and employed at the Black Top mine, east of the city, met with a painful accident, the first of this week, which resulted in the loss of his fingers. While at work in the mine his right hand was caught in machinery, crushing it in such a manner that physicians found it necessary to amputate the ring finger at the base.  The first  two fingers on the same hand were also badly crushed but it is thought that they may be saved. The injured man was taken from the mine to his home in this city and the operation was performed by Dr. C. A. Moore.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday Nov. 6, 1902 Pg. 3 C. 2

The funeral of George Burteft, the miner who was killed by a fall of coal at King’s mines Tuesday, was held this afternoon at 2 o’clock and was largely attended. The interment was made in Northwood cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 12 Dec 1912 pg. 5 c. 4

Miner Badly Bruised

Peter Calta, a foreigner, of Forsythe mines, had his right leg badly bruised and cut Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock, while at work.  His leg was caught in the machinery, inflicting several deep wounds.  He came to Cambridge and the limb was dressed by Dr. Bates.

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The Jeffersonian, 30 June 1930 pg. 1 c. 2

Louis Callihan Is Electrocuted

Cambridge Colleries Expert Comes In Contact With Two “Hot Wires”

Louis Callihan, of Byesville, aged 45 years, for 21 years chief electrician for The Cambridge Collieries Co., met instant death Sunday afternoon at 4 o’clock when 4,000 volts of electricity coursed through his body as he came in contact with two of three “hot” wires at the top of a 20 foot pole at Walhonding No 2 mine, near Buffalo.

He was making repairs to the feed line supplying the mine with electrical power. Assistants were standing on the ground watching him when his body suddenly sagged and then tensed as though in extreme agony. Before aid could reach him he fell back from the two wires and was suspended at the top of the pole by his life belt which he had fastened before beginning his work.  HE was dead when workmen went up the pole meant of a ladder and lowered his body with a rope. Coroner Robins, of Buffalo, was summoned. The fingers of both hands were burned almost to the bone where they had come in contact with the wires.  Herlan’s ambulance at Byesville was called and made a quick run but efforts at resuscitation were not resorted for his heart had stopped beating several minutes before the arrival of the ambulance.

Employes are mystified over Callihan’s electrocution. He was thoroughly versed in electrical engineering and was aware that the wires he was handling were “live.”

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30 June 1930 pg. 3 c. 4

Louis Callihan Is Electrocuted

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His long service with The Cambridge collieries Co., reflects his ability in the Electrical field and his death is a loss that will be distinctly felt. For a number of years he had been in charge of the electrical work at all of the mines of the company.   He was regarded as an extremely cautious workman and frequently performed the more hazardous tasks rather than trust them to other members of his force, fearing that such an accident as happened to himself might result.

The body was later removed to his home at 229 Seneca street, Byesville. Mr. Callihan was a member of Byesville Lodge No. 654, F. and A. M.   He had a large number of close friends and was well known in this city.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Linnie Callihan and two children.  Mrs. Goldie Rogers and Lewis Callihan, both of the home, one granddaughter, Jacqueline Yvonne Rogers and three brothers, Charles and Guy Callihan, of Byesville, and J. W. Callihan, of Zanesville; also his father Mose Callihan, of Byesville.  One son, Ross, is deceased.

Funeral services will be held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Benjamin Green pastor of the Byesville First Baptist church.  Interment will be made in the Byesville cemetery.

Byesville lodge of Masons will have charge of the services.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 20 Feb 1902 Pg. 3 C. 2

Wm. Campbell, a young man about 18 years of age, employed as a coal miner in the Walhonding mines near Pleasant City, was caught by a fall of coal and slate yesterday and instantly killed.  Coroner Vorhies was called and held an inquest last evening.  Mr. Campbell was a popular young man and highly respected in the neighborhood.

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Guernsey Times, 7 sept 1918 pg. 1 c. 3

Miner Met Death When Run Over By Coal Car Friday

William Campbell, aged 47 years, was instantly killed at the Trail Run mine, of the Cambridge Collieries Company, Friday morning at 9 o’clock when he was run over by a coal car.

The unfortunate man was attempting to stop the car, on which the brakes is said to have failed to work, when he fell in front of the wheels and was badly crushed.

The body was removed to the Conner morgue at Byesville, where it was viewed by Coroner W. M. Lawyer.

The deceased was a well known citizen, who had been employed at the Trail Run mine for a number of years. He is survived by his wife and six children.

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The Jeffersonian, 25 Jan 1912 pg. 5 c. 4

Pick Handle Saves A Life.

The fact that the point of his pick stuck in a soft place in the ground in falling, holding the handle upright, undoubtedly saved the life of Charles Cappes, a coal miner, who was working in one of the mines east of the city Monday afternoon.  He was almost buried by a fall of slate, but the heaviest part was held up to some extent by the pick, thus saving him from fatal injury.

While Mr. Cappes was at work he tested the roof of the room, thinking perhaps that the slate might be about to fall, but apparently it was safe and he continued with his work. Then came a sudden rumbling and before he could get out of danger the mass fell.  In dropping his pick one point struck in the ground, and one of the largest pieces of slate rested on the handle.  Mr. Cappes right leg was painfully bruised and cut, otherwise he escaped injury, and was brought to his home No. 416 Ninth street, South Cambridge, where the injury was dressed by Dr. Deweese.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 24 Oct 1912

Miner Caught by Fall of Slate

Byesville, O., Oct. 22- John Christian aged about 36 years, living on Second High street and employed as a machine man in Little Kate mine narrowly escaped being killed by a fall of slate about 3 o’clock Monday afternoon.   Fortunately the man fell in a hole between the ties of the track in the mine and received a gash cut about four inches long on his left leg and his left hip crushed.  The injured man would have been instantly killed had not the track and timbers protected him.  Dr. Lowthian, of Buckeye, was called to the mine and dressed the injuries.  Conner’s ambulance brought the injured man to his home.

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The Jeffersonian, 31 Jan 1916 pg. 5 c. 3

 Head Crushed Between Cars

George Clark, of Coshocton, driver, employed in the Harryette mine of The National Coal Co., was probably fatally injured early Monday morning. He was found by fellow miners with his head badly crushed and has been in an unconscious condition since the accident.  It is believed that he was caught between cars.  Dr. E. L. Lowchian was called to the mine and gave medical attention.

A special train was run over the Pennsylvania railroad from the mine to the Ninth street crossing where the injured man was placed in Eberle & Stevens ambulance and taken to the Cambridge hospital. He is under the care of physicians but it is believed the injuries will prove fatal.  Relatives in Coshocton were notified by telegram soon after the accident.

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The Jeffersonian, 14 May 1921 pg. 1 c. 5

Charles Clough Died Of Injuries.

Goodyear Miner Was Terribly Crushed Late Friday Afternoon.

Charles Clough, age 20 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Clough, 453 North Second Street, was fatally injured in the Goodyear mine,  near Lore City, of the Akron Coal Company, while making his last trip of the day as a trip rider and died on the Baltimore & Ohio labor train before reaching Cambridge.

The young man was riding a trip of loaded cars, one of which was derailed, pinning him against a rib of coal.  He was extricated from the wreckage and Dr. Charles Shively, of Lore City, administered first aid attention.  His right jaw was torn loose, face lacerated, head rushed and body badly bruised.

Mr. Clough was being brought to a Cambridge hospital accompanied by Dr. Shively, Supt. Shooter and Mine Boss Miles when death occurred.  He had been employed in the Goodyear mine for the past four months and prior to that time was

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Pg. 5 c. 3

Charles Clough Dies Of Injuries

(Continued from Page One)

In the employ of the Cambridge Collieries company.  He was born at Robins and was an active member of the Christ’s Lutheran church, having lived in Cambridge for the past seven years.  Mr. Clough was held in high esteem by his fellow-workers and associates in Cambridge.

Besides his parents the deceased is survived by three sisters and two brothers, Loreta, Margaret, Blanche, Fred and Albert Clough, all of the home.  The body was viewed by Coroner Bates at the Stevens morgue and an inquest will be conducted later.

Funeral services will be conducted at the home on North Second street, Monday morning at 10 o’clock by Rev. Charles F. Sheriff, pastor of the Christ Lutheran church.  Interment will be made in Northwood cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 28 Jul 1926 pg. 5 c. 3

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate

Senecaville, July 28—Paul Colbony 65, of Lore City, was crushed to death by  a fall of slate Tuesday evening, at 8:30 o’clock in the Black Top Mine, near Lore City, where he was employed.  The body was removed to the home, following the accident.

Surviving are the widow and two daughters, Mrs. Copec, of Lore City, and Mrs. Morack of New York.

Funeral services will be conducted in Lore City Friday.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 10 Oct 1901 Pg. 3 Col. 4

Fall of Slate

In the Walhonding Mines at Pleasant City Kills one Man and Injures Another.

Ira Cohagan, a coal miner employed in the Walhonding Mines, was caught by a fall of slate and coal Saturday noon and so badly injured that his death resulted shortly afterwards. Cohagan who was working in the place of a fellow miner, was caught by the fall of slate while calling dinner.  He was carried to the surface and Dr. H. H. Bown, of Pleasant City, called.  An investigation of the injured man revealed the fact that his spinal cord had been injured at the small of his back, and knowing tht very little could be done for him there. Cr. Bown advised that he be taken to the Mt. Carmel Hospital in Columbus as soon as possible. The injured man was bought here on the evening train and taken to Columbus.  But on arriving there it was seen that his death was only a matter of a few minutes and that nothing could be done to save him.  In fact the hospital surgeons expressed surprise that he had lived as long as he had.  He died soon after reaching the Columbus hospital and the body was brought back here Sunday and taken to Pleasant City Mon morning.  The body was met at Zanesville last night by the father of the deceased who accompanied it home. Mr. Cohagan leaves a wife and three small children to mourn his death. George Brown who was working with Cohagan at the time, was also injured by the fall of slate.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 30 Apr 1903 Pg. 3 C. 6

W. C. Collins Killed

Byesville, O., April 23 -Special-William Collins was caught by a fall of coal while at work in the Central mines, near Byesville, about 10 o’clock Thurs. morning and instantly killed.

Collins at the time of his death was engaged in putting in wires at the bottom of a shaft when without a moment’s warning a quantity of coal fell upon him.  The body was crushed in a frightful manner.  The noise of the falling coal was heard by his fellow workmen, who after a great deal of hard work removed the coal from the body and took it to his home.

Mr. Collins was about forty years of age, and married.  A wife and three sons are left to mourn his death.

Coroner Vorhies was notified of the accident and went to Byesville at noon.  Mr. Collins was well known in Byesville and was popular with all the men employed in the mine.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 14 Apr. 1904 Pg. 5 C. 3

Miner Killed

By Fall of Slate at Blue Bell Friday Morning

Charles Collins, who resided near Blue Bell, and was employed as a miner in the Hazel Mine, met with an accident Friday morning that resulted in his death.

While at work a large quantity of slate fell on him, breaking his collar bone, one leg and crushing his breast.  He was taken to his home where he died about four o’clock the same evening. He leaves a young wife and a large circle of friends to mourn.  His wife is a sister to ex-County Examiner A. A. Barton.

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The Jeffersonian, 2 Jan 1923

Mr. T. F. Craft, aged 61 years, was taken suddenly ill at his work at Trail Run mine No. 2 Saturday morning, and died before a physician could reach the mine. HE was removed to the Herlan morgue, where Drs. Bates, Huth and Patton held a past mortem, after which the body was prepared for burial and removed to the home on Short street.  He leaves a widow and several children.  Funeral services were conducted from the Methodist Protestant church, Monday afternoon by the pastor, Rev. Chas. E. Bolen.  Interment at Greenwood.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Nov. 7, 1901 Pg. 2 C 3

Instantly Killed!

James Crawford, an Employe at Nicholsons Mines, Instantly Killed by a Fall of Slate.

James Crawford, of this city, who is employed in Nicholson’s mines, east of the city, was caught by a fall of slate and coal Wed. about noon and instantly killed.  At the time Mr. Crawford who has been employed in Nicholson’s mines for some time, was engaged in buying a railway track in the mines and in the course of his work found it necessary to knock away a prop which helped to support the roof and which was in the way of the track. Mr. Crawford examined the roof and walls and thought it would be safe to take away the prop which he proceeded to do. As soon as the prop was removed the ceiling was weakened and without a moment’s warning fell. His fellow workmen heard the noise of the falling coal and ran to his assistance but before he could be reached he was dead. His skull had been crushed. The body was removed to the entrance of the mine and later was removed to this city. Coroner Vorhies was notified of the accident and viewed the remains before removal. Deceased leaves a wife, two sons and two daughters to mourn his death.

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The Jeffersonian, 6 May 1919 pg. 7 c. 4

Instantly Killed

David Courry of this city, who is employed in the Harriette mine, was instantly killed Tuesday afternoon by a fall of slate.  He was brought to Conner’s morgue in their ambulance.

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The Jeffersonian, 26 Sept 1922 pg. 1 c. 1

Miner’s Head Struck Timber

Byesville, Sept. 26—Adam Darmfall, 57 years of age, was almost instantly  killed at Little Kate mine of the National Coal Company at noon Monday. He was riding on a mine car from  his room to the opening and his head struck at timber. He lived but six minutes following the accident. Dr. C. Bates, coroner, viewed the body and ordered it prepared for burial. The body was removed to the Herlan morgue.

An inquest in the death was conducted today by Coroner Bates who announced a verdict of accidental death after four witnesses had been examined.

Funeral services will be conducted at the Roman Catholic church Wednesday morning by Rev. Father Sonkup. Interment will be made at Mt. Calvary cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 5 Oct 1920 pg. 1 c. 2

Miner Crushed By Fall Of Slate

John Daugherty Sustained Injuries in Mathews Mine Today That Prove Fatal.

John Daugherty who was fatally crushed by a fall of coal at the Mathews mine of the Mathews Coal Co., Tuesday morning, died at the Cambridge hospital Tuesday afternoon at 1;40 o’clock.

John Daugherty, age 30 years, of R. D. 6, a miner employed at the Matthews mine of the Matthews Coal Company on the Cambridge-Byesville road, was seriously and probably fatally injured Tuesday morning at 7:30 o’clock when caught beneath a fall of coal. Dr. W. N. Bradford and A. G. Ringer were summoned and administered first aid treatment before his removal in the Stevens motor ambulance to the Cambridge hospital.

So severe were his injuries and the shock that the attending physicians were unable to make a thorough examination to determine the extent, but his left leg was badly crushed above the knee, head cut above the right eye and he sustained minor bruises about the head and limbs.  He suffered excruciating pain from his injuries.

From preliminary observation it was thought by the attending physicians that he had escaped internal injuries, but whether amputation of the left leg, would be necessary was not determined Tuesday noon.

Mr. Daugherty formerly lived in Cambridge and was employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad company.  He is a member of the Moose fraternity.

Upon several occasions he has had narrow escapes from death while employed in the mines in Guernsey county and upon one occasion his working partner was killed in the Walhonding mine.   He is married and has five children.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 1 Aug 1901 Pg. 2 C. 5

Fall of Slate

Crushes Out the Life of James T. Davis at Central Mines Byesville Monday.

James T. Davis a miner employed at the Central Mine near Byesville, was caught by a fall of slate Monday Morning while at work in the mines and so badly injured that his death resulted about 3 o’clock the same afternoon. At the time of the accident Mr. Davis was in a stooping position working on the floor of the mine when, without a moment’s warning, the heavy mass of slate, coal and earth fell on him striking him on the neck and back.  The sound of the fall attracted the attention of the other miners and knowing that Mr. Davis had been at work there just before the fall, they started to get him out from  beneath the slate, after which he was taken to his home and physician called.  Everything possible was done for the injured man but he was so badly injured that his life could not be saved.

Mr. Davis was about 60 years of age and leaves a wife and five children.  The funeral will take place Wednesday afternoon. Coroner Vorhies was notified of the accident and went down last evening and again today.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 4 July 1901 Pg. 3 C. 4

Instantly Killed

Ed DeVore, is Killed by Fall of Slate at Derwent Mine This Morning.

Ed. Devore, a young man employed in the mines at Derwent, was instantly killed by a fall of slate about ten o’clock this morning.  His head was crushed, ten tons of slate fell upon him.  He was a nephew of mine Superintendent Perry DeVore.   The body was taken to his boarding house near by the mines and the examiner notified.  Mr. DeVore was employed as a driver, as we learn.  There is as yet no detail theory as to the cause of such an immerse fall of slate.

On Thursday evening about seven o’clock.  David Jones who was employed in the Hartford mines, was seriously and it is feared fatally injured by a fall of slate, while at work in the mine.  Our latest advice is that little hope is entertained of his recovery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 29 Aug 1901, Pg. 3 C. 4

While at work at the Central Mine on Monday morning Simeon Dickens, of Grant  street, had his right leg broken just above the ankle by a fall of stone. He was taken to his home where Dr. Ringer reduced the fracture and he seemed to be resting as easy as could be possible under the circumstances until toward midnight.  About that time he began to get drowsy and flighty and soon passed into a comatose state from which it has been impossible to arouse him although the best medical skill has been in attendance. He apparently does not suffer pain, rests perfectly easy and is apparently in a deep sleep.  At the time of going to press he has been in this condition for about 36 hours with no signs of returning consciousness—Byesville Enterprise.  Mr. Dickens died Saturday morning.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 22 Oct 1903, Pg. 3 C. 5

Gas Explosion.

Fred Donley, a young boy employed as a trapper in the Walhonding mines, in Pleasant City, was killed on the 14 by an explosion of gas in the mine and James Lotten And John Kackley were also badly injured.  The mine entry where the explosion occurred was wrecked.  Coroner Vorhies was notified and went to Pleasant City to hold an inquest.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 7 Oct 1897 Pg. 3 C. 2

Frank Dougherty of Pleasant City, aged about 25 years a coal miner employed in the Cisco mines was injured by a fall of slate Thursday afternoon while at work in the mines.  He was tenderly carried to his home by friends and physicians called, but could do nothing, as he had been fatally injured and died later.  He leaves a wife and one young child.  Coroner Dougherty was notified of his death and with Constable Gallup went to Pleasant City to hold an inquest

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Sept 1923 pg. 2 c. 1

Died At Hospital

Albert Drogros aged 31, of Walhonding, who was hurt by a fall of slate, and was taken to a hospital at Cambridge, died Monday. He leaves his widow and five children. The body was taken to the Herlan morgue and prepared for burial, which will take place Wednesday at Pleasant City.  Funeral services at 10 a.m. at the Catholic church in Pleasant City conducted by Father Soukup.

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The Jeffersonian, 8 May 1934 pg. 1 c. 1

Slate Fall Kills George Duke In Red Bird Mine

George Duke, 54, of four miles east of Cambridge, was instantly killed Tuesday morning at 8 o’clock when he was crushed under a fall of slate in red Bird Mine. Cambridge R. D. 7, while he was working.

Surviving are his widow; four daughters, Jane, Elizabeth and Zella fo the home, and Mrs. Leona Nealy, of Cambridge; three sons, James of Smithfield, O., and George and Jack of the home; one brother, Emmett Duke of Cambridge; three sisters, Mrs. Samuel McKim, Mrs. Cora Dunlap, Mrs. Margaret Hill and Mrs. Ollie Watson, all of Cambridge, and two grandchildren.

The deceased had been employed as a miner all his life and was a member of Cambridge Lodge L. O. O. M.

The body was taken to the McMillen and Scott funeral home, where it was viewed by Deputy coroner H. R. Neeland. The body will be taken to the home on the National highway Tuesday evening.

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Cambridge Times, 4 Oct 1917 pg. 1 c. 4

Walter Dunning Killed In Mine

Caught In Fall Coal, While Engaged At work–Funeral Friday

The funeral services of Walter Dunning, who was killed at Forsythes mines Wednesday by a fall of coal, will be held at the home of the deceased, 130 Rainey Ave. Friday at 1 p.m. and will be conducted by Rev. Lilly, of the First United Church. Interment will be made at Wallace cemetery, south of Cambridge.

The deceased is survived by the following relatives, Mrs. Elizabeth Dunning, his mother, who is 80 years old, of Cambridge, brother John, of near High Hill, Robert of this city, and Sam and Charles of East Cambridge, one sister, Mrs. Kathryene Buhn of Columbus his wife and two children, James Dunning of Englewod, Col., and Mrs. A. J. Burdalow, of Canton, also the following step-children, Clark, Earl and Georgia Padget, and Mrs. Thomas Valentine.

Mr. Dunning’s work was very     (Continued on Page Two.)

(Continued from Page One)

Walter Dunning

Dangerous and he was engaged in snubbing or blocking a shot after placing a shot and was sitting down. Without warning a large lump of coal broke off from the main mass falling on him.  Eberle and Stevens’ ambulance brought him to Cambridge, where he was prepared for burial.  He is survived by a wife and two children.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 Jul 1905 pg. 5 c. 5

Coal Miner Injured.

Andy Duran, a coal miner employed at King’s mines, was very painfully injured Friday afternoon by a fall of coal and slate. His right leg was crushed from the hip down and two fingers of his right hand cut off.  The injured man was taken to a Columbus hospital Saturday evening for treatment.

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The Jeffersonian,  26 July 1919 Pg. 1 c. 1

Suffers Crushed Hip At Walhonding Mine

John Dzora, an employe of the Walhonding mine of the Cambridge Collieries Coal Co., was crushed about the right hip while at work in the mine Thursday afternoon.  He was carried to the entrance of the mine and Dr. Robbins, of Hartford, was called and rendered medical aid after which he was brought to the Cambridge hospital in the Conner ambulance.

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Cambridge Herald, 4 July 1889 pg. 3 c. 3

After we had gone to press last Wednesday, the word came to us that John Earley, a respected miner, was killed by falling slate in the Guernsey mines east of town. The deceased was aged about 60 years, and formerly lived at Washington. The sorrowing relatives have the sincere sympathy of many friends.

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The Jeffersonian, 20 Sept 1924 pg. 1 c. 8

Thomas Edgar Killed In Mine

Thomas Edgar, 57, of Opperman, was almost instantly killed Friday when caught by a fall of slate while at work in a coal mine near New Philadelphia, according to word received in Cambridge. He had worked in the Tuscarawas county mine but three days.

The accident occurred Friday afternoon and members of the family were called Friday evening to New Philadelphia.

Mr. Edgar was employed until recently at Maple Leaf mine just as he was not receiving steady employment sought work in the coal fields around New Philadelphia. He managed to secure employment Wednesday.

Mr. Edgar was well and favorably known in Guernsey county, having been active in the United Mine Workers organization of this county for many years.  He leaves to mourn his death his widow, five sons and three daughters.

It had not been learned here Saturday whether the body will be returned to Guernsey county for burial.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 25 Aug 1898, pg. 3, c. 4

Albert Edwards, who was injured in the Klondike mines last March, died Sunday.  Coroner Daugherty was notified of the death and is now taking testimony in the case.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday,  4 June 1891, Pg.  3 C. 2

Elmer Edwards, an employe at Trail Run mines was crushed to death last Wednesday by a fall of slate. He was about twenty-eight years of age and leaves a wife and four children, the youngest only ten days old.  The body was interred in Center Graveyard on Thursday.  Mr. Edwards was a highly respected young man, and his families have the deepest sympathy of many friends in their bereavement.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday,  4 June 1891, Pg.  3 C. 2

Elmer Edwards, an employe at Trail Run mines was crushed to death last Wednesday by a fall of slate. He was about twenty-eight years of age and leaves a wife and four children, the youngest only ten days old.  The body was interred in Center Graveyard on Thursday.  Mr. Edwards was a highly respected young man, and his families have the deepest sympathy of many friends in their bereavement.

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The Jeffersonian, 1 Mar 1944 pg. 8 c. 5

Mine Accident Claims Life

Byesville, March 1 –Andrew Eibel, 42, Pleasant City, died Tuesday at 8 p.m. at St. Francis hospital as a result of chest injuries received Monday evening when crushed between a car and post at Rigby mine, near Senecaville where he was employed.  He was hurt internally.                                                          Besides his widow, Anna, Mr. Eibel is survived by five sons, Richard, Robert; Bernard and Jacky, of the home, and Albert, of U. S. army air forces in North Carolina; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Eibel, Pleasant City; five brothers, and five sisters. He was a member of the holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 26 July 1906, pg. 3, c. 2

Jump From Cars Ends In Death

Andy Estock, aged fifteen years, employed as a trapper in the Wills Creek Coal Co.’s  mine at Blue Bell, died Tuesday as the result of injuries sustained Monday.

As the loaded cars passed the door he was supposed to watch.   Young Estock jumped on the first car afterwards jumping off and again getting on the rear car out of sight of the motorman.

In some manner he fell to the rails and before the cars could be stopped was run over.

Dr. Bowen, of Pleasant City, was called and later Dr. Walters, of Cumberland, was summoned but after a consultation it was decided that the boy could not withstand an operation, owing to his weakened condition.

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The Jeffersonian, 28, Oct 1919 pg. 5 c. 3

Coal Miner Was Badly Injured

Tony Fann, age about 35 years, of Little Kate mine, No. 2, had his right leg badly mangles Monday evening at 1 o’clock when he was caught in a coal cutting machine while at work in the mine.

First aid treatment was given at the mine by Dr. Linton and the injured man was removed to the Lawrence hospital and underwent an operation for the amputation of the leg between the knee and ankle. The operation was performed by Dr. Lawrence, Keenan and Linton. He was reported Tuesday as resting well.

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Guernsey Times, 211 Jun 1918 Pg. 1 c. 3

Instantly Killed

Alexander Fenlay, familiarly known as Sandy, who resides west of town, was instantly killed by a fall of slate in Little Kate mine No. 1 of the National Coal Co., Thursday afternoon at 1:30.  His head was crushed and he was removed to the Conner undertaking parlors where he was prepared for burial and later removed to his home.  The deceased is survived by a widow and five children, who have our heart-felt sympathy in their sudden and sad bereavement.

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Cambridge Times 1 Nov 1917 pg. 1 c. 4

Death Resulted From Injuries Sustained In Mine

Miner Caught In Fall Of Slate Dies As Results Of The Accident

Ellis Ferras, aged 47 years, a foreigner who was injured last Monday in the Minnehaha mine at Dogtown, by a fall of slate, died Thursday morning at 9 o’clock at Keenan’s hospital. He is survived by a wife who is in the old country and one brother here, Nesser Ferras.

His body was taken to Byesville today and prepared for burial. Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon.

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The Jeffersonian 22 Jan 1936 pg. 1 c. 3

George Fetzko Is Killed By Slate

Accident Occurs in Rigby Mine, Near Senecaville, Early Monday Morning

George Fetzko, Sr., aged about 52, of East Cambridge, was instantly killed Wednesday morning at 7:30 o’clock when he was caught beneath a fall of slate in an old entry in Rigby mine of the Akron Coal Co., near Senecaville.  He was alone at the time and was found under about a half ton of slate.

Mr. Fetzko and his son, George, Jr., of Buffalo, had gone into the mine for the day’s work.  The elder man took a short cut to his working place through the old entry and his son went around the inspected route.  When the boy arrived at the working place his father was not there and he started out in search of him.

The rock struck his head, which was badly crushed. The body was removed to the McMillen and Scott funeral home, South Tenth street, where it was viewed by Coroner R. M. Six.  Death was said to have been caused by a basal fracture of the skull.

In addition to the skull fracture the accident victim’s right leg was fractured above the knee and he sustained several cuts on the nose and forehead.

The deceased leaves his widow and 11 children, George Jr., of Buffalo; John, Paul, Margaret, Mildren and Irene all of the home; Mike of Lancaster CCC camp; Mrs. Anna Novak, city; Mrs. Sue Hubert, Mrs. Mary Hague and Miss Helen Fetzko, of Akron.  Two brothers, Mike and John of Central City, Pa., also survive.  He was a member of the Greek Catholic church at Pleasant City and had resided in East Cambridge since 1918.

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The Jeffersonian, 8 Mar 1917 p8 c 3

Byesville Man Badly Injured

Alexander Finley employed as machinist at Buffalo mine, was painfully injured Tuesday about noon. The machine skidded and caught his right leg. His leg was badly bruised and mashed but no bones were broken. It was thought until Dr. Patton was called and made an examination, that the bone was broken.  He was brought to Byesville on the 11:20 car and taken in Conner’s ambulance to his home south of town.

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Cambridge Times, 7 Dec 1917 pg. 1 c. 1 & 2

Workman In Coal Mine Met Death In Mysterious Way

Found Dead By Fellow Workmen; Believe Death Due To Kick By Mule

A fatality which occurred at the Forsythe mines, four miles east of Cambridge Thursday night at 10 o’clock, is puzzling relatives and friends of Sim Fisher, colored, aged 30 years, who was found dead in the mine by fellow workmen.

Mr. Fisher had been at work, and at ten o’clock, the hour of quitting, his fellow workmen  went to the top of the tipple and waited about 20 minutes for him to come out.  Upon his failure to come out of the mine, they became uneasy and went back to search for him. They found him lying under a car of coal, to which a mule had been hitched, but which had broken away and was standing some distance from the scene. Fisher was dead. A mark was discovered on his body just under the left shoulder and it is believed he was kicked by the mule. The fatality is regarded as purely accidental, but in what manner the accident occurred is not definitely known.

The unfortunate man was employed as a mule driver. He lived near Old Orchard mine, and is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Steven Fisher, wife and one child Ernest, aged 3 months, and the following brothers and sisters, Turner Fisher, Steven Fisher, Jr., James, Arthur, John, Mrs. George Isaacs, Mrs. William Young and Mrs. Alfred Ranson.  Funeral services will be held from the A. M. E. Church in this city Sunday, conducted by Rev. Newsome, pastor of the church.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 Jan 1921 pg. 3 c. 3

Funeral Thursday

Funeral services for Clifford Fogle, who was killed Monday by a fall of slate in the Mary Jean mine, of the Wayne Mining company were held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clark Fogle, of Coshocton avenue, conducted by Rev. Mr. Rich, pastor of the Senecaville Methodist Episcopal church.  Burial was made in Northwood cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Apr 1925 pg. 1 c. 6

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate

R. D. Folden, age about 45 years, of Newcomerstown, was crushed to death Saturday by a fall of slate in Scott’s coal mine, one mile south of Cambridge. The accident occurred Saturday morning at 9:30 o’clock and he passed away Saturday afternoon at 12:45 o’clock at the wells hospital, where he had been removed in the Stevens ambulance.

Mr. Folden was loading coal when the slate fell, striking him about the head and body. At the Wells hospital an examination by Drs. Huth and Wells disclosed that the man’s jaw had been broken, chest crushed, several ribs broken, crushed though the hips and had suffered internal injuries. His recovery was considered doubtful from the outset.

Mr. Folden had been employed at Scott’s mine since the mine near Newcomerstown had shut down. He was a powerful man physically, but the fall of stone was heavy.

The body was removed to the Stevens funeral home where it was prepared for burial and relatives in Newcomerstown were notified.

This was the second fatality in coal mines in Guernsey county within four days as John Gall, sr., was fatally crushed Wednesday afternoon by a fall of slate in Ideal mine of the Cambridge Collieries company.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 6 Aug 1891, Pg. 3 C. 3

Pat. Forbes, aged about 21 years, a miner was caught while at work in Mathew’s mine on Tuesday by falling slate and so severely injured that he died that evening about nine o’clock Mr. Forbes was unmarried and had no relatives in this country. The funeral was conducted by Rev. J. G. Montag at Gibson’s on Thursday.

The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 30 Jan 1896, Pg. 3 C. 2

Coroner Daugherty held an inquest Saturday in the case of Hiram Geary who lost his life last Tuesday in the Pioneer coal mine.  Inspector Goff was present.  It was found that the cause of Geary’s death was purely accidental.

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Guernsey Times, 26 Mar 1914 pg. 1 c. 2

Three Men Injured At Black Top

Two Men Buried Under Two Tons of Coal

A Series of Mishaps Marks Day’s Work at Work at Morris Co.’s Black Top Mine

There was a series of accidents, three miners being injured at the Black Top mines, owned by the Morris Coal Company, Wednesday. They are Clifford Friel, skull fractured; Lee Brill, hurt about the body; and Revere McConnell, left foot mashed.

The first accident occurred about 1 o’clock Wednesday morning, when a fall of coal caught Friel and Brill, who are employed as loaders. Friel’s head was pinned to the ground under a two-ton fall of coal, which fractured his skull. His left cheek and ear are badly lacerated and since the time of the accident he has suffered with hemorrhages of the head.

He had not regained consciousness at 10 o’clock last night. His fellow workman, Lee Brill, was completely covered with coal, but not seriously hurt, having escaped with a few slight bruises about the body.

Dr. Arndt of Lore City, was summoned and later the men were removed to their homes. Friel, who is about 23 years old and married, lives at Lore City, Drs. Arndt and Holliday of that place, are in attendance and his condition is considered critical.

The last accident happened about 2:30 Wednesday afternoon, when Revere McConnell, aged 17, employed as trip-rider, had his left foot run over by an empty car. No bones were broken, but the injury is painful. He was taken to his home at Kings Mines, where Dr. Arndt was called.

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The Jeffersonian, 3 Jan 1929 pg. 5 c. 4

Miner Crushed By Fall Of Slate

David Friley, aged 56, a loader at Rigby mine, of the Akron Coal Co., was crushed to death Wednesday afternoon when he was caught beneath a fall of slate while at work.

Fellow workmen dug the mass of slate away from his body which was viewed by Coroner J. E. Robins, of Buffalo, who ordered it prepared for burial. The man’s face, skull and chest were crushed.

The victim had been employed at the mine for the past five months, during which time he lived at Senecaville.  His former place of residence was at Jackson, O.  He was a member of the Red Men’s lodge of Jackson and the Eagles lodge at Athens.

He is survived by five children, Guy, of Senecaville, Charles, of Senecaville; Mrs. Edna Chester, of Toledo, and Minnie and Walter, of the home; also two sisters, Mrs. Rose Whitlock of Middle port; and Mrs. Margaret Hope of Canton. His wife died four years ago.

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The Jeffersonian, 15 Apr 1925 pg. 1 c. 3

Fire Boss Is Fatally Hurt

John Gall, Sr., 50, fire boss at Ideal mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co., was probably fatally crushed Wednesday afternoon when caught by a heavy fall of slate while working in the mine.

Mr. Gall suffered a fracture of the skull at the base of the brain, and was severely crushed about his chest and shoulders.  Dr. Patton, of Byesville, gave first aid at the mine after which the injured man was removed in the Herlan ambulance to the wells hospital, where Dr. Huth, Wells and Patton attended him.

Mr. Gall lives near Ideal mine and was doing extra work when injured.

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The Jeffersonian, 28 Sept 1922 pg. 9 c. 3

Miner Injured

Andrew Garver was injured while at work at the Maple Leaf Mine, Tuesday, when he was caught between two cars.  His right leg was badly crushed.  Medical aid was summoned and the injured man was removed to his home in Pleasant City.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 29 May 1902, pg. 1, c. 7

Instantly Killed

Grover German, of Pleasant City Meets a Horrible Death in Walhonding Mines Wednesday Night

Grover German, aged about seventeen years, met with a horrible death in Walhonding mines near Pleasant City.  Young German was employed as a driver at the mines.  He reported for work at the usual hour last night and had made a number of trips without accident before the one on which he met his death.  On returning from his trip he was cheerful and while his cars were being loaded he joked and talked with the miners and helping them with their work never thinking that the next trip would be his last.

When his cars were loaded and after a few joking remarks to his companions he gave the signal and the cars started on what turned out to be a ride to death for him.  When about half way to the entrance of the mine the car on which he was riding jumped the track and German was caught between the car and the side of the entry, crushing out his life. When found the young man was dead and the body crushed in a horrible manner.

Grover German was almost 17 years of age and lived with his father in Pleasant City. He was a popular young man, well liked by all the miners and his death has cast a gloom over the entire neighborhood. The funeral took place Saturday morning at 10 o’clock.  Coroner Vorhies has been notified of the accident.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 28 Jan 1904 Pg. 4 C. 3

Fatally Burned.

One Man Fatally.   Another Painfully Burned at Senecaville

Senecaville, O. Jan. 26 1904 (Special.) Early this morning as Guy Gingera, a Slavish miner, was filling a cartridge with powder in the Sommers Coal mine, a spark from his lamp ignited a keg of powder causing a violent explosion by which he was terribly burned all over his body which it is thought will necessarily prove fatal.  His fellow workman, John Bolaski, also a Slavishman, in attempting to extinguish the fire of Gingera’s burning clothing, had his hands painfully burned, but is not thought to be seriously injured.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 3 Jan 1901, Pg. 3 C. 3

Louis Gladman

Accidentally Killed at Walhonding Mine Saturday Morning.

Louis Gladman was horribly madzied in the Walhonding mine Saturday morning, his death following in the evening.  Mr. Gladman, who was a trapper, was temporarily called from his post of duty returning just as a trip was nearing the door. He succeeded in opening the trap but had no time to jump out of the way.  The whole trip of a motor and thirty loaded cars passed over his body, amputating his left arm and leg, fracturing his skull and breaking nearly every bone in his body.

Gladman was a single man. His burial took place at Washington, O., on Sunday

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 18 Sept 1913 Pg. 1 C. 5

Miner’s Life is Crushed Out

Victor Godrie, Employed as a trip rider in Little Kate Mine, No. 2, of the National Coal Co., was almost instantly killed Tuesday afternoon at 1:15 o’clock, when he was caught between two cars in the mine. He was standing between the cars making a coupling, when they came together, crushing him so that death resulted in a very few minutes. Dr. Lowthian was called but the man was dead before the arrival of the physician.

Mr. Godrie was about 30 years of age, and was single. He lived with a number of foreigners near the mine and had been employed in Little Kate Mine No. 2, for a number of years.  He was regarded as a valuable employe.   Coroner Rowles was notified of the death.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 Sept 1932 pg. 1 c. 8

Mine Inspector Dies Of Injuries

Robert Gollop, aged 54, of Byesville, deputy state mine inspector, was fatally injured at 10 o’clock Tuesday morning in Walhonding mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co., near Pleasant City, when he was struck and run over by a string of empty mine cars. He died at 12:45 o’clock Tuesday afternoon at Swan hospital in this city.

His injuries consisted of a fracture of his right leg between the knee and hip, broken left shoulder and crushed chest.  Following the accident he was attended at the mine by Dr. McCormick, of Senecaville, who ordered his immediate removal to Swan hospital.  A Byesville ambulance was summoned and he reached the hospital at 11 o’clock.

Mr. Gollop entered the mine with the fire boss and the mine boss on an inspection trip and was walking between them on the track when the string of empties struck him and knocked him down.  It is not definitely known whether the cut of empties passed over his body or whether the fatal injuries were caused by the impact.

The accident victim was well known throughout Guernsey valley.  He had been a state deputy mine inspector for several years and the kindly demeanor and genial personality won him many friends. He is survived by his widow and two sons and two daughters.  The body was taken to the Herlan undertaking establishment in Byesville.

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The Jeffersonian, 26 Aug 1941 pg. 1 c. 1

Miner Dies In Slate Fall

Byesville, Aug. 26—Adam Gouldbourn, about 50, this place, was instantly killed Tuesday at 1 p.m. when caught under a fall of slate while working at Beech Grove mine, south of here.

Over two tons of slate fell on him, crushing his body badly.  No one else was injured. Ray VanDyke, Derwent, was working with him, but had left to get a drink of water shortly before the accident occurred, it was said.

Mr. Gouldbourn is survived by his widow, one son, a daughter, and his father, George Gouldbourn, Byesville.  Two brothers, Walter and Arthur Gouldbourn, of Cambridge, also survive. The body was taken to the Herlan funeral home.

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The Jeffersonian, 17 Sept 1923 pg. 3 c. 2

Miner Injured

George Gourgous, age 81 years, of Pleasant City, was severely crushed by a fall of slate in Walhonding mine of the Cambridge Collieries company Monday morning.  He was loading coal in the mine when caught by the debris.

Dr. Patton, of Byesville, gave first aid, after which the patient was removed to the Cambridge hospital, where Dr. Patton was assisted by Dr. George Swan.  Mr. Gourgous condition Monday afternoon was regarded as critical.  He was crushed about the chest and back.

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Sept 1923 pg. 5 c. 4

Fatal To Miner

George Gourgous, of Pleasant City, who was crushed Monday morning by a fall of slate in Walhonding mine of the Cambridge Collieries Company, died Monday afternoon at the Cambridge hospital from his injuries. He was crushed about the chest and back and when admitted to the hospital his condition was regarded as critical. The body was removed to the Herlan morgue in Byesville where it was prepared for burial.

Mr. Gourgous was 31 years of age and had been employed in the mines in Guernsey county for a number of years.

The Jeffersonian, 8 Apr 1931 pg. 1 c. 7

Fall Of Slate Kills Miner

Caught beneath a fall of slate in Harryette mine of the National Coal company Wednesday morning at 11:30 o’clock while at work, Mike Govalchik, aged 63 years, of Little Kate mine, was almost instantly killed.  Govalchik was employed in the mine as a loader and the rock fell without warning. He was badly crushed about the face, his neck was broken, both legs broken and he was injured internally.  Death resulted within a few minutes after the accident.

The body was removed to the McMillen & Scott undertaking parlors, where an inquest was conducted Wednesday afternoon by Coroner J. E. Robins. The body will be held at the morgue pending funeral arrangements.

Mr. Govalchik was an experienced miner, having worked in the Cambridge coal field mines for many years. His wife died several years ago.  Two sons reside in Cleveland and efforts were made Wednesday to locate them.

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The Jeffersonian, 9 Mar 1925 pg. 1 c. 5

Miners Injuries Prove Fatal

Crushed between two cars of coal while working in Kings Mine, of the Akron Coal Company more than two weeks ago, caused the death Sunday night at 5 o’clock, at the Wells hospital, of John Samuel Gray, age 32 years, of Kings Mine.  He was squeezed through the abdomen.

Mr. Gray was removed to the Wells hospital following the accident and x-ray pictures of his injury were taken, showing them to be of a dangerous nature. The body was removed to the Stevens morgue and prepared for burial, and will be taken to the home Monday evening.

Surviving are his widow, three sons, two daughters, mother, two brothers, Thomas and Alexander Gray, both of Pennsylvania, and four sisters, Mrs. Ann Brickma, of Indiana; Mrs.  Mabel Minart, Mrs. Bettie Jones and Mrs. Isabelle Mott, all of Pennsylvania.

Funeral services will be conducted at the Kings Mine Community Home at 10:20 o’clock Wednesday morning. Interment will be made at Northwood cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 11 Jul 1912 pg. 4 c. 3

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate

Steve Gumbos, employed as a machine man in Walhonding mine No. 2 of the Cambridge Collieries Co., was caught by a fall of slate while at work Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock, and was so badly injured about the head that he died one hour later. The deceased was 27 years of age and had a family, living in the old country.  He had been employed in the Walhonding Mine No. 2 for a number of years and was regarded a good operator.

At the time of the accident the deceased and John Batchick were in a room, when the latter, it is alleged, knocked away a post extending from the floor to the roof. As the post fell Batchick noticed the slate give way and calling out a warning jumped to safety. Mr. Gumbos was not so fortunate, and while in the act of jumping was caught.  Batchick called a number of men working in the mine and the injured man was removed and a physician called.

The funeral will be held Wednesday.

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The Jeffersonian, 1 Aug 1933 pg. 5 c. 4

Miner Is Caught By Falling Slate

Joseph Gust, aged 59, of Byesville Stop 9, was fatally injured at 11:30 o’clock Tuesday morning in the coal mine off the Nicholson Clay Products Co., near Byesville, when he was caught beneath a fall, of slate.  He died three hours later at Wells hospital of internal injuries.

Gust sustained a fractured pelvis, broken right leg, and cuts and bruises on his head and body.  He was rescued from beneath the slate by fellow workmen and immediately was taken to Wells hospital where his injuries were x-rayed.  It was believed when the examination was made that the internal organs had been crushed.

The victim is married and has several children. The fatality is the first at the Nicholson Clay Products plant for several years. The plant recently resumed operations after being idle for several months.

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Nov 1934 pg. 2 c. 3

Back Is Broken By Slate Fall In Mine

James Hamilton, aged about 45 years, of Cambridge R. D. 6, sustained a broken back Thursday afternoon at 2:15 o’clock, while working in the Lucas mine, near Kipling.  His condition is regarded as serious.

Hamilton was rescued from beneath he mass of slate by fellow workmen and was removed to Wells hospital where he was attended by Dr. Henry Wells.

An x-ray examination revealed that the first lumbar vertebra had been fractured.  It is Dr. Wells opinion the spinal cord was completely severed.  Hamilton’s lower extremities are paralyzed and no encouragement for his complete recovery had been given.

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Jan 1917 pg. 1 c. 7

Young Miner Is Painfully Hurt

Ferdry C. Hall, age 22 years, of 711 Stewart avenue, was painfully injured Thursday at 12 o’clock, while at work in the Pigeon Gap coal mine north of the city.

Mr. Hall is engaged as a loader in the mine, and was accidentally pinched through the back and stomach, when he was caught between the car and a rib of coal.  He was removed to this home and Dr. W. M. Lawrence called.

Just how serious the injuries are cannot be determined now, but he is not thought that he is injured internally.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 16 Aug 1877, Pg. 3 C. 3

Death in a Coal Mine.

Last Friday, William Hall, a miner in Scott’s Coal mines east of town met his death by being crushed by a block of coal which fell on him while he was in the act of undermining it.  He was working in a room about eleven hundred yards from the mouth of the mine, and was last seen alive about nine o’clock that morning.  Between twelve and one o’clock in the afternoon, Jonas H. Blaneen, a miner, went to Hall’s room to borrow a drill, and discovered Hall lying on his right side with his face toward the coal and his shovel under his shoulder, and a large block of coal that would probably weigh a ton, lying on his head and shoulders.  The alarm was given, and the miners lifted the coal off of him and sent the body home.  When found he had been dead four or five hours.  There being no coroner within ten miles, Eliza Turner, J. P. was notified, and held an inquest of the body, the following jury being empaneled: P. T. Suitt, James Moffatt, Robert Reed, Thos. B. Towner, G. W. Padgett and I. F. Norman.  The jury, after hearing the evidence, brought in a verdict that the deceased came to his death by the accidental falling of a body of coal that he was undermining.

It appears that Hall bad set off a blast the previous afternoon, and it had made a fissure back of the coal where he was working, and when he had mined thro’ this coal to the fissure the whole block fell.  Hall was born at Durham, England in 1822, and had lived in this country twenty three years. He had followed mining ever since his fourteenth year, and was a careful and reliable man. He leaves a wife, but no children.

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Nov 1934 pg. 2 c. 3

Back Is Broken By Slate Fall In Mine

James Hamilton, aged about 45 years, of Cambridge R. D. 6, sustained a broken back Thursday afternoon at 2:15 o’clock, while working in the Lucas mine, near Kipling. His condition is regarded as serious.

Hamilton was rescued from beneath the mass of slate by fellow workmen and was removed to Wells hospital where he was attended by Dr. Henry wells.

An x-ray examination revealed that the first lumbar vertebra had been fractured. It is Dr. Wells’ opinion the spinal cord was completely severed.  Hamilton’s lower extremities are paralyzes and no encouragement for his complete recovery has been given.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 18 Apr 1918 pg. 5  c. 4

Miner Injured

Jacob Hammond, age 65 years, of 127 Jones avenue, was seriously injured Tuesday morning when he was caught by a fall of coal in the Murray Hill mine of the Akron Coal Company.

Dr. L. M. Ross was summoned to the mine and gave medical attention. The injured man was removed to his home in the Hope ambulance.

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Cambridge Jeffersonian, 10 Mar 1898 pg. 3 c. 4

A Miner Killed

George Hansey, a miner who was employed at the Cisco mines near Pleasant City was almost instantly killed by a fall of coal in that mine at 10 o’clock Thursday morning.

Hansey had been working in the Cisco mine but a short time and came here from the Hocking Valley district and as he was a man who seldom spoke at any length of himself, very little was known about him but it is thought that he was married and leaves a family.

Hansey had been working by himself a little distance from the other miners.  About ten o’clock he dug a hole in the wall into which he placed a quaintly of powder intending to shoot the charge and this loosen the coal,  after the shot had been made he stepped forward and found that the charge had not done much work and taking his pick he commenced to work.  He had been working with his pick but a short time, when, without any warning, the coal fell on him, almost burying his from sight.  His fellow work-men hearing the noise of the falling coal and having seen Hansey standing there the minute before using his pick, they hurried to the spot, where their worst fears were realized.  They soon had the coal removed from the injured man and tenderly picking him up they carried him from the mine. When found Hansey was alive but he expired a few minutes afterward.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 25 Jun 1903 Pg. 3 C. 3

APPALLING!

Are the Results of the Explosion of Dynamite at the Somers Mine Near Senecaville Saturday

Later Reports do not Give the Number of Killed and Injured so Large. Six Killed and Sixteen injured.  Thousands Visited the Scene Sunday

The accident at the Somers mines near Senecaville Saturday at noon when about three thousand pounds of dynamite were exploded as the result of a strike of lightning, killing six men and injuring at least sixteen more, was the most appalling in the history of Guernsey county.  The accounts of the accident published in the Jeffersonian Saturday evening were not entirely correct, owing to the excited condition of the people of Senecaville who sent in the news, and while fortunately later reports are not so bad as the first, the result was bad enough.

When the news was first received here the people were almost stunned and could hardly realize the awful significance or grasp the frightful details.  Little else was talked of on the streets.  As soon as the news of the accident were received, the physicians realized that prompt assistance was needed and without a moment’s hesitation a number promptly telephoned offers of assistance if needed.  Coroner Vorhies was one of the first to be notified and after talking with the authorities in Senecaville, hurriedly gathered up what he would need to assist the injured and left at once for the scene.

The only telephone line reaching from this city to Senecaville was the Hoyle & Scott line and the girls at the central office were kept busy all afternoon supplying the news and connection the Senecaville line with the anxious inquirers here who wanted to learn whether or not any of their friends or relatives had been injured or killed.  The list of those killed, revised to Monday, is as follows:

SAM HARTUP, Foreman of Carpenters: back of head crushed.

RUSSELL HARTUP, son of Sam Hartup: neck broken.

WILL MAHONY, carpenter; back of head crushed.

HAYES HUTCHISON, laborer; injuries on top and left side of the head.

HIRAM WILSON, workman on shaft; broken timber driven through head.

ROBERT WATSON, carpenter; injured on back of head and forehead: lived several hours.

NICK HAWK, blacksmith; elbow injured, two ribs broken and cut about the head; suffering much and  may not recover.

JOSEPH RIGGS, workman on shaft; right ear nearly torn off, nose and lip cut; bruised generally about head and chest.

KELSEY BROOM, workman; cut about neck, lip and chin; badly hurt.

ERNEST BASFORD, workman,  cut below the right eye, on the forehead and over the left eye; sight not permanently injured.

WILLIAM CALDWELL, injured about the hip, cut over left eye; doing well.

CLINTON DAVIS, workman; cut about the eye and the face generally

ENCIL DAVIS, son of Clinton Davis, cut about the head and face.

FRANK DETRA,

BURT PURDUM, foreman of Shaft Sinking Gang; compound comminuted fracture of left arm; will probably lose his arm; cut on ear and right arm bruised.

JOSEPH HEWISON, workman on shaft; bruised about the back of the head and face, not serious

JAMES NELSON, workman; scratched and bruised about the head

JOSEPH McPEEK, workman; scratched and bruised about the face.

JAMES BASFORD, workman, slightly injured.

FRANK GREENE, workman; slightly cut on the head.

WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER,  workman; bruised.

GEORGE ARMSEY, slightly hurt; not serious

JOHN FARROW, workman on shaft; bruised slightly about the head and face.

The shock of the explosion was felt for miles in the neighborhood of Senecaville, in all directions with the exception of toward the south of that place.  The force of the explosion seemed to be to the north and people living but half a mile south of the place hardly felt the shock, while it was distinctly felt by a number in this city and in Washington

There were about a ton and a half of the dynamite stored in the shanty to be used in sinking the air shaft and all of it was exploded.

The men had taken refuge in the blacksmith shop some distance from where the dynamite was stored, to get out of the rain which came on about the time the men were ready to return to work.  All were talking and joking with each other with never a thought of the awful fate in store for some of them, when suddenly the lightning struck the dynamite magazine, exploding the dynamite and caps. The building was blown to pieces, the force of the explosion tearing a hole in the ground about twenty feet or more in diameter and five feet deep, and blowing a blacksmith shop in every direction. The shop was located about one hundred feet from where the dynamite was stored.

It was impossible to find a piece of the shanty in which the dynamite had been stored within a mile of where it had stood and a large tree which had stood nearby was uprooted and carried away. A double eighthorse power hoisting engine was also carried some distance away.

Many windows in Senecaville was blown out and many of the citizens had narrow escapes from injury because of the flying glass. The boiler and engine house of the mine were badly damaged and will have to be rebuilt.

As soon as the people at Senecaville heard the  noise of the explosion they went at once to the assistance of the injured.  Physicians from Pleasant City and Lore City were called and requests for assistance were sent here. The scenes around the place where the blacksmith shop stood and the cries of the wives, mothers and sisters were heart rending.

Samuel Hartup, foreman of the carpenters employed at the mine, was about 50 years of age and leaves a wife and five children to mourn his death.  The double funeral of Mr. Hartup and his son Russell was held Mon. Afternoon at 2 o’clock in the M. E. Church at Senecaville, the services being conducted by Rev. H. B. Edwards.

The funeral of Hayes Hutchison was held Mon. morning at 9 o’clock at the home of his father, the services being conducted by Rev. Mr. Oliver.

The remains of Wm. Mahoney were taken to Kennonsburg for interment, the Eagles and Mechanics, of which he was a member, having charge of the services. Hiram Wilson was buried at 11 o’clock Mon. Morning the services being conducted by Rev. H. B. Edwards in the M. E. Church.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 July 1918

Miner Caught By Falling Slate

Pete Hazok, of Derwent sustained a fractured left leg, and was otherwise bruised and cut Wednesday afternoon while at work in the Buffalo mine, at Hartford, when he was caught by a fall of slate. Fellow workmen ran to his assistance and he was taken to the surface where Dr. Robins of Hartford, gave first aid. The Conner ambulance of Byesville, was called and the patient removed to the Cambridge hospital Wednesday evening, where the fracture was reduced and his injuries dressed.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 25 Jun 1903 Pg. 3 Col. 7

Funerals of the Victims.

The following account of the funerals of those killed in the explosion of dynamite at Senecaville Saturday, is furnished by the Jeffersonian’s correspondent at that place.

The different funerals held Monday were very largely attended.  There were between seven and eight hundred who viewed the remains of Hayes Hutchison and over eight hundred who viewed at the funeral of Hiram Wilson.  The remains of J. S. Hartup and his son Russell, were viewed by over one thousand.  Alleged her it is thought that there was at least twelve hundred who attended the different funerals.

The Revs. Edwards, Oliver, Thompson and Shafer, from Pleasant City, all took part in the different funerals. The floral offerings were profuse and beautiful. The Cambridge M. E. church sent flowers. In all there were thirteen different  I. O. O. F. lodges represented at the funeral of J. S. Hartup.

The funeral of Robert Watson was not held until Tuesday  so as to allow his relatives to reach this place. The bereaved families have the profound sympathy of everybody. The funeral of Mr. Watson was in charge of the American Mechanics.

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The Jeffersonian, 28 Dec 1942 pg. 1 c. 1

Three Men Trapped In Mine Blast

Three miners were trapped Monday in McFarland mine of the Byesville Coal Company, near Blue Bell, and rescuers are endeavoring to reach them, it was learned Monday afternoon.

The trapped men were Gus Abrams, Pleasant City R. D.2; Robert Haugh, Cambridge R. D. 6, and John Sebek, Byesville R. D. 1.

Only meager reports were available Monday afternoon, however, it was stated the men were trapped after an explosion of gas in the mine, debris cutting off their escape from the diggings.

State mine inspectors joined with miners in digging through the rock in a valiant attempt to reach the entombed miners.

There were between 25 and 30 men in the mine at the time, but no one was injured aside from the three men trapped, who were working in the mine section where the blast occurred.

Fear was expressed that the men would not be found alive.

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The Jeffersonian 29 Dec 1942 pg. 1 c. 6

(continued on page 2)

State To Probe Gas Blast That Claimed Three Lives

Investigation to determine the cause of the gas explosion, which snuffed out the lives of three miners Monday at the McFarland mine of the Byesville Coal Co., near Blue Bell, will not get under way until black damp has been cleared from the colliery officials said Tuesday at the Cambridge state mine laboratory.

P. W. Moore, superintendent of mine rescue in Ohio with headquarters in Cambridge, directed removal of the bodies of the three men, Robert Haugh, 53, Cambridge R. D. 6, Gus Abrams, Pleasant City R. D. 2, and John Sebek, 35, Byesville, R. S. 1 by (continued on page 2)

State To Probe Gas Explosion (Continued from Page One)

Employes of the mine and personnel of Moore’s rescue squads.

Haugh’s body, identified at first of that of Sebek, was the first recovered and was brought to the surface at 5 p.m. Monday.  The bodies of Abrams and Sebek were reached later and were removed from the mine at 10 a.m.  It was necessary to blow black damp from the entry where the explosion occurred before rescuers could reach the victims.

All three bodies were badly burned and crushed by the terrific bore of the explosion, the first evidence of which other employes of the mine had was a trap door torn from its hinges about 1800 feet from the fatal entry.  Sebek’s father, Andy Sebek, and two other men worked the night shift Sunday in the same entry where the blast occurred. The entry was about three-quarters of a mile from the entrance.

Rescuers worked steadily throughout the day in an effort to rescue the men although it was believed from the first that they had met almost instant death.  Directing the work along with Moore was Thomas McFarland, district deputy mine inspectors, and other members of the laboratory staff from the city.

Cambridge state highway patrolmen and sheriff’s deputies controlled traffic in the vicinity of the mine and kept automobiles, other than those there on official business, away from the entrance to the property.  Members of the victims families, employes not on duty at the time and residents of the community were among the crowd gathered at the scene.

Bodies of Haugh and Abrams were removed to the Herlan funeral home, Byesville, while that of Sebek was taken to the Stevens & McCracken funeral home, S. Eighth St.

Sebek was born on Oct. 30, 1907 near Byesville, a son of Andy and Barbara Hegedes Sebek, and spent his entire life in that community.  A member of Holy Trinity Catholic church, Byesville, and Slovak Jednota Union No. 497, Byesville, the deceased was married on July 26, 1930, to Miss Anna Krehel.  Surviving are his widow, three children, Emily, 10, Martha, 8, and Edward 3; his parents; eight brothers and sisters, Mrs. Mary Kendzicky, Byesville, Andy, Jr., and Elizabeth, Byesville R. D. 1; Joseph and Mrs. H. Jasielum, Cleveland, Vincent, U. S. Army, Marenci, Ariz., and Steve, Cambridge R. D. 2; two uncles, John Hegedes, Byesville, and John Sebek, Cleveland.  One brother, Michael, is deceased.

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The Jeffersonian 14 Apr 1944 pg. 5 c. 5

Deaths

B. L. Hayes

Bert L. Hayes, about 70, Byesville, died suddenly Friday at 1 p.m. at the Walnut Hill mine, south of Byesville as a result of a heart attack.  He was working at the mine at the time.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 28 Nov 1895 Pg. 3 C. 3

Joseph Haywood, aged about 38 years, met with an accident in Norris mines Saturday afternoon that caused his death almost instantly.  He was engaged in mining coal; he had made a shot and was returning to see the result when a large piece of slate fell on him.  He had the reputation of being an experienced and careful miner.  This is the first death caused by accident in these mines within 18 years.  He leaves a wife and three small children.  Funeral Sunday, interment in cemetery near Norris

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 24 Dec 1903, pg. 5, c. 2

Gus Hecker, the young man who was injured at Nicholson’s mines about a week ago by a fall of slate, died Saturday from the injuries.  The body was sent to Pomeroy, Ohio Sunday by Undertaker McDonald for interment.  The young man was about 32 years of age, and the remains were accompanied by his father and sister.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 21 Jan 1904 Pg. 5 C 5

Killed by a Fall of Slate

Ed. Hess, of Byesville, an employe of the Central mines at that place, while at work in the mines Monday morning was caught by a fall of slate and instantly killed.  Deceased was about 25 years of age and leaves a wife to mourn his death. Coroner Yeo was notified of the death and went to Byesville this morning to view the remains.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 2 May 1907 Pg.4 c. 3

Fall of Slate at Forsythe’s Mines

Fatally Crushes Joseph G. Hill.

Brother Narrowly Escapes Sharing Same Awful Fate.

Joseph Garfield Hill, coal miner employed at the Forsythe mines, a few miles east of the city, was caught by a fall of coal and slate while at work in the mines Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock and sustained injuries which caused his death a few minutes later.  An examination of the remains after the accident showed that his back was broken, and the chest and right side crushed in a horrible manner. The remains were removed from the mine to the home of the victim where Coroner Yeo, who had been notified, held an inquest.  Andrew Hill, a brother of the victim, had a very narrow escape from sharing his brother’s fate.  Just before the accident he left the place where they were working to procure powder to make a shot, and it was during his absence that the fall occurred.

This is said to be the first fatal accident at Forsythe mines during the entire sixteen years it has been operated.

The victim of the distressing accident was but twenty-seven years of age. He was born June 13th, 1880, and was a son of L. J. Hill, and is survived by father, a wife and one child aged two years.

The funeral services were held at the home Monday morning at 10 o’clock, conducted by Dr. Yarger, and the interment was made at the Center Baptist church.

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The Jeffersonian, 30 Oct 1919

Obituary

John Thomas Hockenberry

John Thomas Hockenberry, son of Peter and Nancy Hockenberry, was born October 17, 1853, and died October 22, 1919, aged 66 years and five days.  In the year 1870 he was married to Miss Hannah Stephens.  To this union were born seven children, all of whom are living.  Albert, Warren, Perry and Joseph, of Byesville, Ohio; Charles, of Cambridge, O.,  Mrs. Etta Gooden, of Akron, O., and Arthur, of the home.  Besides the wife and children he leaves two sisters and one brother to mourn his departure, Mrs. Della Evans, of East Sprata, O.; Mrs. Carrie Bowman, of Clarksburg, W. Va., and William Hockenberry of Chillicothe, O.

In his early life he became a member of the Methodist Protestant church.  He has lived an honest, upright life, was a kind and loving husband and father, and will be greatly missed by all his friends and neighbors.

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The Jeffersonian, 21 Dec 1923 pg. 8 c. 5

Miner Injured By Fall Of Slate

William J. Hoey, an employe of the Akron Coal Company, was painfully injured while at work, in Kings Mine Thursday morning by a fall of slate.  The injured man was taken to his home in a machine driven by Ted Hughes, and Drs. E. E. and Clyde L. Vorhies were called.

After an examination, Mr. Hoey was found to be suffering from a broken ankle and the left leg was badly bruised and mashed. The foot was also badly crushed. Friday he was reported to be resting comfortably.

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Guernsey Times, 20 June 1918 pg. 1 c. 1

Lad Instantly Killed While At work In Mine

Jonas Holaski, aged 18 years, was instantly killed by a fall of slate at the Blue Bell mine where he was employed, Wednesday at 1:30.  His home was near Glenwood. Earl D. Conner, undertaker of this city, was called and took charge of the body which was removed to his home. The funeral services will be held at the Roman Catholic church in this city Friday at 10 o’clock, conducted by Father Lewis Sowkup.  Interest will be at Mt. Calvary cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 3 July 1945

Mine Injuries Are Fatal To Harry Hutton

Byesville, July 3—Harry Hutton, 57, died at 7:30 a.m. in the St. Francis hospital, Cambridge, of injuries received at Sharratt Coal mine last Thursday.  He lived at 262 Euclid Ave., this place. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Hutton, and was born in Byesville where he lived all his life. He was married in 1910 to Margaret Moffett, who with his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Hutton, and the following children survive: James, of Cleveland; Mrs. Clarice Vessels and Mrs. Berdine Schultice, both of the home; and two grandchildren.  One son is deceased. The following brothers and sisters also survive: Mrs. Logan Burt, Byesville; Ross, Lisbon; Arthur, of Akron; Mrs. Richard Davis, Akron; and Mrs. Martha Stallsmith, of Canton. The body was removed to the Herlan, funeral home. Funeral services will be conducted Thursday at 2 p.m. at the Baptist church by the pastor, Rev. W. C. McKeever, Burial will be made in Greenwood cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 30 Jan 1902, pg. 2, c. 6

Joseph N. Jackson, who was killed at King’s mine, on Tuesday of last week, was interred in the Washington cemetery Thursday.

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The Jeffersonian, 10 Oct 1934 pg. 5 c. 4

Injuries Fatal To Senecaville Miner

Injuries suffered 12 days ago when he was caught under a loaded mine car in Rigby mine of the Akron Coal Co., resulted in the death of David Jones, 52, of Senecaville, Tuesday evening at 5:50 o’clock at Swan hospital.

In the accident he sustained a broken right arm, crushed right chest and a fractured pelvis.  It is believed by hospital attaches that the crushed chest was the cause of death.  He was in a serious condition when admitted to the hospital Sept. 28, and steadily grew worse.

Mr. Jones was a lifelong resident of Senecaville and had worked in mines for many years.  Surviving are his widow; two sons, Edris Jones of Cleveland, and James Jones of the home; one daughter, Mrs. Lee Little, of Senecaville, and three grandchildren.

Funeral services will be conducted Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Senecaville M. E. church by Rev. Thomas D. Rees, pastor of the First Baptist church, Cambridge. Interment will be made in Senecaville cemetery.

The body was removed to the Morrison funeral home, Senecaville, and will be taken to the home Wednesday evening.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 30 Mar 1905 Page 3 C. 5

Fall of Slate

In Walhonding Mine Instantly Kills John R. Jones, Thursday Morning Body was Found by Fellow Miners.

Buried beneath tons of fallen slate the remains of John R. Jones, a coal miner employed in the Walhonding mines, was found Thursday morning by his fellow employes, who had become alarmed over his continued absence and had started an investigation as to the cause of his absence.  They had not proceeded far in their search until they came to a great pile of fallen slate, and knowing that it was not there a short time before, they saw at once what had happened to their companion, and without the loss of a moment they started to work throwing aside the slate.

In a short time their worst fears were realized.  The body was found about 10 o’clock, and Coroner Yeo was at once notified and went to the mine to view the remains.

John R. Jones was a Welshman,  41 years of age and is survived by a wife and three children.

Sometime before the accident, Mr. Jones had entered the mine for the purpose of placing a blast.  Everything was in readiness for the explosion and Mr. Jones had gone to another part of the mine where the powder was kept, away from where the men were working, in order to be out of danger from explosions from their lamps.  He had secured the powder and was on his way back to the point where he was going to make the blast when without a moment’s warning he was caught by the falling slate.

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The Jeffersonian, 14 May 1921 pg. 1 c. 7

Fire Boss Was Badly Burned

Louis Jones Ran Into Gas Pocket at Trail Run Mine.

Byesville, May 14—Lewis Jones, of Trail Run, was taken in the Herlan ambulance to the City hospital in Cambridge Friday afternoon suffering with severe burns, caused by an explosion of gas at Trail Run No. 1 mine early Friday morning.

Mr. Jones was a fire boss and was making the usual examination of the mine before the men went to work for the day.  It is thought the accident was due to a pocket of gas caused by a heavy fall of slate during the night.

He was badly burned about the face, hands and body, but is resting as well as could be expected.

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Miner Injured By Slate Fall

Jack Killiany, Cambridge R. D. 6, was admitted to St. Francis hospital Tuesday with injuries received by the fall of slate at the McFarland mine, near Opperman.  He sustained a dislocated right shoulder, fractured right leg, three fractured ribs and back bruises.

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The Jeffersonian, 5 May 1930 pg. 1 c. 3

Orlando Kirk Is Fatally Crushed

Miner Alone In Rigby Mine When Fall Of Slate Occurs

Orlando Kirk, aged 49 years, of Pleasant City, was crushed to death Sunday night at 11:30 o’clock by a fall of slate in Rigby mine of the Akron Coal Co., Senecaville.

Mr. Kirk was employed with several other miners in removing slate falls.  He was alone at the time of the accident.  Other workmen were nearby and were attracted to the scene by the crash of the falling stone, which struck him about the chest and head and pinned him to the floor of the mine.  Death apparently resulted almost instantly.

The body was removed to the Hetlan morgue at Buffalo and prepared for burial and Monday morning was removed to the home in Pleasant City.

The deceased leaves six daughters and three sons.  His wife died several years ago.  He was a member of the Pleasant City M. E. Church, where funeral services will be conducted Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock by the pastor, Rev. Mr. Hubbard. Burial will be made at Pleasant City.

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Cambridge Jeffersonian, 13 Feb 1902 pg. 3 c. 2

Wm. Kleis, a coal miner employed at the Old Orchard mines, was caught between a car, which jumped the track, and a rib of the bank while at work Saturday morning and so badly injured that he died Sunday morning about 4 o’clock.  At the time the man was injured Dr. E. E. Vorhies was called and rendered temporary aid after which the injured man was removed to his home in Byesville.

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The Jeffersonian 12 Jun 1916 pg. 1 c. 5

Two Boys Killed In Local Mines

John Kolosky, aged 16 years, employed as a trapper in the Black Top mine, of the Morris Coal Co., was killed by a fall of coal Saturday morning , at 10 o’clock.  His skull was fractured and the body cut and bruised.

A number of miners working near by heard, the fall of coal and immediately went to the young man’s assistance, but he was dead before the mass of coal could be removed. Coroner Lawyer was notified and after viewing the body, announced he would hold, an inquest Wednesday morning, of this week at 9 o’clock. There will be ten witnesses to examine.

Coroner Lawyer was holding an inquest regarding the death of William Allender, when notified of the death of Mr. Kolosky,  Mr. Allender was 17 years old and had been employed as a loader in the Murray Hill mine of the same company. He was injured Monday by a fall of coal, and died Tuesday. The young man was a son of William Allender, Sr., living at Kings Mines.

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The Jeffersonian, 12 May 1919 pg. 1 c. 5

Miner Killed in Fall of Slate

Joe Kotch, aged 22 years, employed as a miner in the Harriette mine of the National Coal Company, was killed Friday afternoon by a fall of coal.  The deceased had lived at Harriette mine for some time and the only known relatives in this country is a sister living in New Jersey.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 14 Mar 1912 Pg. 2 C. 5

John Kovack, employed in the Forsythe mine, east of the city, was caught and badly injured by a fall of slate while at work in the mine Monday Morning. The injured man with a number of others had prepared a shot and immediately after it had been fired, reentered the room. Mr. Kovock was in advance of the other, and was caught.  He was carried from the mine and Dr. L. M. Ross was called.

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Guernsey Times, 12 Apr 1915 pg. 1 c. 3

Long Suffering Of Miner Ends At Senecaville

Steve Kovack Dies From Broken Back Injured In Slate Fall Last September 5

Steve Kovak, single, a Hungarian, died Saturday night at Senecaville, after suffering for seven months with a broken back.

September 5, Kovak’s back was broken by a fall of slate in the Senecaville mine, where he was employed. He was brought to the Cambridge hospital and later taken to Mt. Carmel hospital at Columbus, but nothing could be done to save his life, and he was returned to his home in Senecaville.  Considering the nature of his injury, his living so long after the accident is regarded as remarkable.

Coroner W. M. Lawyer had been notified of the death, and will leave for Senecaville this morning to hold the inquest.

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The Jeffersonian, 22 Jan 1938 pg. 3 c. 1-2

Lore City Miner Crushed To Death By Fall Of Slate

Joseph Krall, 33, prominently known in baseball circles in Guernsey county, was instantly killed Friday afternoon at 1:15 o’clock when caught beneath a fall of slate at Rigby mine of the Akron Coal Co. aid, but they heard the crash and rushed to Krall’s aid.  The slate struck his shoulders, neck and head; causing instant death.  Krall had been an employe of the coal company for a number of years and was highly respected by his fellow employes. Surviving, are his widow, one son, his mother and a number of brothers and sisters.

The young man had been interested in sport since boyhood and nearly always was given a position on independent baseball teams in the Lore City community, winning the admiration of his team mates and opponents, alike for his sportsmanship and fair play.

The body was removed o the Seider funeral home, Lore City.

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The Jeffersonian, 21 Sept 1916 pg. 1 c. 1

Body Burned Almost To Crisp

Fire Boss Of Blue Bell Mine Victim Of Gas Explosion

__Thursday Morning

George Kranak, Age 50, Died Today, at Cambridge Hospital, From Injuries.

George Kranak, aged 50 years, of Pleasant City died at the Cambridge city hospital, Thursday afternoon, at 1:00, after suffering untold agony since 4:30 o’clock Thursday morning when he was terribly burned, as the result of an explosion of gas in the Blue Bell mine, of the Cambridge Collieries Co.

Mr. Kranak, fireboss of the mine, left his home early Thursday morning, arriving at his work about 3 o’clock. At the time of the accident he was making his rounds of the mine. On Wednesday a number of men had been employed in driving a rock entry, in which a pocket of gas had collected, and when Mr. Kranak entered that place with his light, the gas let go with terrible force. He was burned from the top of his head to his feet and the skin on his hands, face, head and body was reduced almost to a crisp.

Following the explosion he staggered for a distance of 800 feet through the mine with his clothes smoldering and after making a frantic effort to extinguish the sparks he was rescued by the water bailer. Harry Williams, who at once called to companions who were near at hand. With their assistance the burning clothing   (Continue on Page Three)

Body Burned Almost To Crisp   (Continued from page one.)

Was extinguished and the victim was carried to the entrance of the mine where first aid was given him. Dr. Wallenfeltz, of Pleasant City, was called and found Mr. Kranak in a very serious condition. He was taken to the street car junction near Pleasant City and brought by way of interurban to this city at 10 O’clock.

He was removed to the Cambridge hospital from the car by the Taylor & Lyon’s ambulance. An examination was held by Drs. Wallenfeltz and Huth and an attempt was made to dress his burns, but upon touching his hands the skin and finger nails drooped off, causing the patient to suffer excruciating pain. At the hospital everything possible was done by the attending physicians, but so horribly was he burned about the body, arms and face, that ho hopes for his recovery were held out.

Mr. Kranak is one of the oldest and most experienced fire bosses in Guernsey county, as he has held that position almost all of his adult life, and is well known among the miners. He was for a number of years fire boss in the old Walhonding mine, at Pleasant City, where he had lived for a number of years, and has been employed by the Cambridge collieries Co. for a number of years.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 8 Feb 1912 Pg. 8 c. 7

Coal Miner is Fatally Injured

Byesville, O., Feb 6.—Andy Kuvalic, aged forty-five years, employed as miner in the Puritan Coal Co.’s mine near Byesville, was caught between the ribs of the shaft and the hoisting cage Monday afternoon, about 3 o’clock, and so badly injured that he died at his home in Byesville, at 7 o’clock Monday evening.

With about ten other miners he had completed his day’s work in the mine and they were riding to the mouth of the shaft on the hoisting cage, when Kavalic, who it was reported was subject to heart trouble, suddenly fell between the cage and the ribs of the shaft, being crushed about the  chest and shoulders.

The cage was stopped as quickly as possible and the man who had been wedged in between it and the shaft was removed and taken to the mouth of the shaft. He was brought to this place on the 3:30 o’clock street car and taken to the office of Dr. J. E. Pation, where an examination was made, showing that his left hip had been broken, and that he was badly crushed through the chest.  In addition his head was struck against a heavy piece of timber and he was injured internally.

It was apparent that very little could be done to save the man’s life, and Conner’s ambulance was called and he was taken to his home, where he died in the evening at 7 o’clock.  The injured man remained unconscious until the end.  He is survived by his wife and three children. Coroner A. G. Ringer was notified at the accident and viewed the remains.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 19 Feb 1903, pg. 3, c. 3

Al. LaFollett, a coal miner employed at Black Top mine, near Lore City, was almost instantly killed Saturday afternoon as the result of falling from the cage as it was ascending from the bottom of the shaft.  His neck was broken and skull fractured. Deceased was about thirty years of age and leaves a wife and two small children.  Coroner Vorhis was notified of the accident and went to the mine Saturday to hold the inquest.  The funeral was held this morning at 10 o’clock.

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The Jeffersonian, 24 Dec 1934 pg. 5 c. 7

Miner Crushed By Slate Fall

Firmia Lafollette, 59, of Buffalo, is in a critical condition in Wells hospital as the result of a slate fall Monday morning at 9 o’clock in Walhonding mine of the Cambridge Colleries Co.

Lafollette was working with two other men at the time of the fall but his fellow workmen escaped injury. The slate struck him on the left side, pinning him to the ground, and it was several minutes before he was released.

His skull was badly fractured on the left side, several ribs were broken and his left lung was punctured.  He was unconscious when admitted to the hospital and slight hope is entertained for his recovery.

Mr. Lafollette had been employed in mines for 40 years since he was 16 years of age, and this is the first time he had been injured in a mine accident.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 10 Mar 1904, pg. 4, c. 4

Miner Killed

George Lamb, aged 56 years, employed as a coal miner in the Black Top mines, near Lore City, was caught by a fall of slate while at work in the mines Monday afternoon at about 2:15 o’clock, and instantly killed, his left side being crushed.   Coroner W.R. Yeo was notified of the accident and went to Lore City this morning to hold the inquest.

After the remains had been viewed by the coroner they were taken to Summerdale, the former home of the deceased, where the interment will be made tomorrow.

Mr. Lamb was the father  of the superintendent of the Black Top mines and was well liked by the other men in the mine.

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Guernsey Times, 7 Jan 1919 pg. 1 C. 3

Workman Instantly Killed in Accident At Mines, Yesterday

Dewey Larrick was instantly killed in the Blue Bell mine of the Cam-morning at 9 o’clock when a car which he was driving collided with another car.  The driver of the other car escaped injury.

The unfortunate young man was 20 years old and is survived by his widow and one child.  The family have recided at Blue Bell for some time.  The accident was reported to Coroner Bates, but he was to il to give the case attention and a justice oof the peace was called to view the body and hold the inquest.        (No mistake in typing, this is the way the paper read)

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 5 Jun 1902, Pg. C. 2

Doc Larrison, a machine miner at Forsythe’s mines, was caught by a fall of coal and slate Tuesday about noon, and badly injured about the head and neck. Dr. O. F. Lowry was called.  An examination revealed that there were no bones broken but there was a long and deep cut in his neck.

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Guernsey Times, 22 Apr 1915 Guernsey Times pg. 1 c. 4

Miner Killed By Slate Fall At Black Top

James Lawrence, aged 47 years, was instantly killed by a fall of slate in the Black Top mine of the Morris Coal Company at 8:30 o’clock Wednesday morning.

The unfortunate man was working with his son, John Lawrence, at the time. The son was warned of the approaching danger and called to his father to jump, but the elder man was caught and buried by the fall.

The debris was quickly removed by other miners but the man was dead when taken out. Coroner W. M. Lawyer was notified and after viewing the body ordered it prepared for burial.

The deceased was survived by his wife and five children.  He had been employed by the Morris Company for a number of years.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 5 Nov 1903, pg. 3, c. 1

James Lawton, who was injured in the explosion at Walhonding mine, died Saturday morning, Oct 24th, after a week of intense suffering.  Funeral services were held Monday at 10 O’clock at the Lutheran church, the Odd Fellows, K. of P. and Forester Lodges officiate.  Interment at the Pleasant City cemetery. Pleasant City Citizen.

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The Jeffersonian, 20 Sept 1920 pg. 1 c. 6

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate—At Senecaville

Senecaville, Sept. 20—Mike Leishen, aged 35 years, was instantly killed by a fall of slate in the Cleveland mine of the Morris Coal Co.  Sunday morning, his head being almost severed from the body.  Another man working near by narrowly escaped injury.

Mr. Leishen, is survived by his widow, two daughters and one son. The funeral services will be held here Tuesday morning and the interment will be made in the Pleasant City cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 21 Aug 1902, pg. 3, c. 4

Injuries Prove Fatal

Coroner Vorhies received a telegram this morning announcing that George Letsak, the second of the Slav coal miners injured by an explosion of a keg of powder in Old Orchard last Wednesday, died about 3 o’clock this morning.  The Coroner went to the mines after receiving the message and viewed the remains. Deceased leaves a wife and one child to mourn his death.

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The Jeffersonian, 13 Sept 1930 pg. 9 c. 4

Miner Injured By Fall Of Stone

Quaker City, Sept. 12—Mansel Long, Baileys Mills, employed at Moonshine Mine, was severely injured Tuesday while at work in the mine, by a fall of stone. He was removed to a Martins Ferry hospital, where x-ray revealed a broken collar bone, one lung punctured and several broken ribs.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 26 May 1904, pg. 1, c. 1

Wilson T. Long Dead

Wilson T. Long, who was injured by a fall of slate at the Old Orchard Mine Monday while he was leaving the mine after his day’s work, died Wednesday night from the result of his injuries. Coroner Yeo was notified of the death and went to the Old Orchard mine this morning to hold the inquest.  Deceased was about 51 years of age and leaves a family of six sons and one daughter to mourn his death.

The funeral services were held at his late home two miles east of Byesville Friday morning at 10 o’clock.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 19 Oct 1905, pg. 1, c. 5

Miner Killed Near Byesville.

Abraham Love, a young man about 18 years of age, employed at the Ideal mine near Byesville, was killed Saturday afternoon while at work in the mine.

Mr. Love was employed to switch the cars from one track to another and while engaged in this work a car jumped the track catching him against the side of the entry.  The young man was terrible crushed about the chest and lived about an hour before death came to relieve his sufferings.

The funeral services were held this afternoon and were very largely attended as deceased was a popular young man. James Pritchard, a district mine inspector of the Third district, living at Hemlock, the former home of deceased, attended the services.

A number of very handsome floral offerings were prepared by I. A. Oldham, of North 7th street, for friends of deceased, and sent to the funeral services Tues morning.

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Guernsey Times, 21 Apr 1915 pg. 1 c. 1

Injured Miner Is Examined

A.R. Mallett, of Lore City who was injured in the Black Top mine by a fall of slate 21 weeks ago, was examined here Tuesday by Dr. H. H. Dorr, medical examiner for the state industrial commission.

The injuries which Mallett sustained in the mine accident were very serious, his body being badly crushed. The amount which he will receive under the workmen’s compensation act is expected to be announced soon.

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The Jeffersonian, 25 Sept 1923 pg. 1 c. 8

Pleasant City Miner Killed

Pleasant City, Sept.  25—Steve Mallett, 46, of Pleasant City, fire boss at Banner Mine of the Cambridge Collieries Company, was instantly killed by a fall of slate while at work Tuesday morning at 10:30 o’clock.  The body was removed to the home here.  His widow and eight children survive.

Mr. Mallet was working by himself in the mine and as far as is known no one saw him struck down by the slate.  His lifeless form was discovered under the debris within a half hour, it is said.  He had long been in the employ of the Cambridge Colleries Company and was an experienced miner.

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The Jeffersonian, 25 Nov. 1922 pg. 2 c. 3

Mr. David Maneilly

Mr. David Maneilly was born in County Antrim, Ireland, July 13, 1851, and died at his work near Byesville Nov. 18, 1922, aged 71 years, 4 months and 5 days.

In his early young manhood he moved to Scotland and was there united in marriage to Miss Janet Middleton Dec. 21, 1869, and to this union there were born eleven children, viz: Mrs. Catherine Moffatt, David, John, Samuel, Thomas, George and Mrs. Jessie Lanning all deceased; James of Ava, Mrs. Lizzie Bishard, Mrs. Maggie Foraker and William all of Byesville, who together with the widow survive the father and mourn his loss.

When but a young man living in Scotland he accepted Christ as his Saviour and from that time his life has been identified with the church, after coming to Guernsey county he united with the U. B. church where he was a recognized leader until he united with the First Baptist church of Byesville and was baptized by the present pastor Rev. W. H. Wilson.  His devotion to the cause of Christ early marked him as a trustworthy leader and on July 1, 1906, he was ordained to the Deaconate of the First Baptist church of Byesville where he honored his sacred office until removed by death.

David Maneilly possessed remarkable and rare traits of character; he was courageous, fearless, and sturdy as the rock ribbed mountains and yet possessed a spirit as sweet, as gentle and kind, as a fond mother. The sunshine of his presence and the kindliness of his heart won even the hearts of the little children, of whom he had many devoted friends who will miss him and long for his presence again.

He was a man who loved his country and stood on the right side of every great moral question. He lived religious liberty and when in his home land was an enthusiastic Orangeman.

In his departure the family loses a devoted husband, an affectionate father, the church one of its most faithful members and Byesville one of her truest citizens.

Funeral services were conducted in the First Baptist church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock p.m. by his pastor. Interment took place at the Enon cemetery.

The numerous floral tributes, and the large throng of people who attended the obsequies were but a fitting expression of the high esteem in which he was held by all the people.

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Guernsey Times, 1 May 1914 pg. 1 c. 2

Killed By Fall Of Slate In Blacktop Mine

Repair Man at Work in Mine Meets Instant Death Yesterday Afternoon.

Charles Maruzik was killed almost instantly by a fall of slate Thursday afternoon while at work in Black Top mine of the Morris Coal company, near Lore City.

With other men, Maruzik was employed in repairing the mine, during the shut-down. He went into a room alone and removed a post used to hold loose slate, in place. There was a crash of slate and coal, and when his fellow workmen reached him life was extinct.

Coroner Rowles was summoned and went to Lore City on train No. 104.  He found the dead man’s head badly crushed, his back broken and several ribs torn loose. The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o’clock.

Maruzik was 37 years of age, married. His wife and two children have lived in Austria-Hungary for five years.  They formerly resided near Black Top.

Coroner Rowles will hold the inquest at his office Monday morning at 10 o’clock.

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The Jeffersonian, 24 Jan 1929 pg. 1 c. 8

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate

A fall of slate and coal in Plainview mine of the Plainview coal Co.  crushed out the life of Mike Maxim, aged about 35 years, of near Dogtown, at 12:30 o’clock Thursday afternoon.

Maxim was employed as a loader in the mine and was moving through an entry when the fall came without warning and almost completely buried him.  Fellow workmen rushed to his assistance and worked frantically to remove the pile of debris from his body. He died, almost instantly, however, being crushed about the head and back.  When he was extricated it was found his right leg had been broken at the hip and doubled across his back.

The body was removed to a Cambridge undertaking establishment and was to be viewed late this afternoon by Coroner J. E. Robins of Buffalo.  Maxim was married and the father of several children.

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Cambridge Herald, 15 Apr 1886 pg. 3 c. 3

James Maxwell, a miner at Mathews mines, had his head cut and face badly burned by a blast, last Saturday.

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The Jeffersonian, 11 July 1916 pg. 6 c. 1

Cao Miners Had Narrow Escapes

One Was Caught Between Two Cars and Another Crushed by Fall of Slate

Byesville, O., July 11—Charles Mehok, employed in the Trail Run mine, No. 2, had a narrow escape of instant death Monday morning when he was caught between two cars.  His head and shoulders were badly cut and bruised.

Steve Marki met with a painful accident Monday morning while employed as a loader at Minnehaha mine. He was caught by a fall of slate and sustained a bad cut on his head, a broken knee and was also badly bruised about the body.  Dr. V. H. Danford was the attending physician.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 16 Apr 1903, pg. 3, c. 2

Kanl? Mesko, a miner employed in the Walhonding mines at Pleasant City, was killed by a fall of slate yesterday.  He was thirty years of age and married.  Coroner Vorhies went to that city today to hold an inquest.

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The Jeffersonian, 21 Mar 1934 pg. 6 c. 4

William Messenger Is Fatally Crushed By Fall of Slate

Barnesville, March 21—William W. Messenger, a miner, was killed Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock by slate which fell on him while he was at work in Moonshine Mine, near Bailey’s Mills.  He was crushed through the chest and death was instantaneous.  The deceased was 67 years of age and had been a resident of this community for a number of years.  He is survived by two sons and a daughter, Sherman Messenger of Bailey’s Mills, with whom he made his home, Andrew Messenger, of Flushing and Mrs. Harriett Coleson, of Moundsville, W. Va.  His wife preceded him in death several years ago.  The Guernsey county coroner was called and the body was moved to the Campbell Funeral Home. Funeral services probably will be held on Thursday.  Leonard Carpenter, aged 35 of Quaker City, who was working near Messenger at the time of the accident, escaped with minor injuries.

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The Jeffersonian, 15 Feb 1930 pg. 2 c. 4

John Miller

Byesville, Feb 15—Funeral services will be held at the Roman Catholic church here Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. Sokup for John Miller, aged 20, who died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Miller near Maple Leaf Mine Friday morning from injuries received when he was crushed beneath a fall of slate late Thursday  in a small country mine near his home.  In addition to his parents he is survived by one brother. Burial will be made at Pleasant City cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 10 Jan 1919 pg. 1 c. 5

Miner Killed When Caught by Big Slate Fall

George W. Milton of Byesville, was instantly killed by a fall of rock in the Republic mine near the Mt. Zion church, at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon.

When other workmen in the mine succeeded in prying the rock off the man, they found he was dead. The body was badly smashed.

The remains were taken to the surface and removed to the home in Byesville where they were reviewed by Justice A. M. Baxter of this city, acting for Coroner Bates.

Mr. Milton was 45 years old and a well known citizen of Byesville.  He is survived by his wife and four daughter.

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The Jeffersonian, May 23, 1901 Pg. 3 C. 4

A Sad Accident!

Russ Mitchell Accidentally Killed at King’s Mines Monday About Noon.

Russell Mitchell, a well known colored resident of South Cambridge, was accidentally killed about 12 o’clock Monday while at work at Kings Mines.

Mr. Mitchell was engaged in driving at the time the accident occurred.  He was bringing a number of cars of coal from an entry, and just as the cars came to the main entry one of them jumped the track as the curve was being made. Mitchell was caught between the car and the side of the entry, crushing his breast and otherwise injuring him.  He lived only three minutes after the accident.

Coroner Vorhies and State Inspector of Mines were notified and the body was brought to Cambridge.

The deceased was a son of Mr. and Mrs. James Mitchell of the South Side. And he leaves his parents, three sisters and two brothers, a wife and a two year old daughter to mourn their loss.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 26 Jul 1906, pg. 3, c. 5

Death List is Growing

Slate Boss Meets Instant Death and Another Miner is Painfully Injured.

Charles Monroe, employed as slate boss in the Walhonding mine near Pleasant City, was killed while at work Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock Mr. Monroe had been at work removing loose slate from the roof in one of the rooms of the mine, when a piece larger than he expected fell and in attempting to get out of the way he was hit, the force of the blow knocking him against a nearby slate truck on which his head struck, killing him instantly.

The fall of slate attracted the attention of other workmen who immediately set about removing the coal and slate and removed the body to Mr. Monroe’s home. He was about thirty eight years of age and is survived by a wife and two small children.

Charles Cramblet, employed as a miner  in the Old Orchard mine, was painfully injured Thursday afternoon in a collision between two cars.  He was going with a number of other miners toward the entrance, after the day’s work was over, when the cars came together and the impact threw him to the ground cutting a deep gash in the forehead. Dr. Cain was called and dressed the wound.

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The Jeffersonian, 11 Dec 1915 pg. 1 c. 6

Crushed Thru Chest

Thomas Moore, a machinist at Forsythe’s mine, was badly crushed through the chest Saturday noon, when he was caught between a post and a mine car. Dr. C. A. Frame was called. The car struck Moore with such force as to knock down the post.  Though he is suffering intense pain, it is not thought that his injuries will prove fatal. He is married and lives at the mine.

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The Jeffersonian, 30 Mar 1931 pg. 12 c. 4

Injuries Cause Death Of Miner

Injuries received last Wednesday when he was caught beneath a fall of slate in Buffalo mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co., resulted in the death Sunday morning at 8:30 o’clock of Thomas R. Moore, aged 55, of East Cambridge, at the Little Clinic in Byesville.  Moore was crushed about the head and chest.

Moore had been a resident of Guernsey county all of his life and had been employed as a coal miner for many years. He is survived by one daughter, Miss Mary Moore and three sons, Paul, Leo and Sterman, all of the home; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Nelson and Mrs. Elizabeth Bernard, all of East Cambridge. His (line is unreadable)bridge, of which he was a member, conducted by the pastor Rev. E. K. Rogers, assisted by Rev. John McLeod.  Interment will be made at Northwood cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Sept 1916 pg. 8 c. 5

Miner Caught By Falling Slate

  1. Y. P. U. Met With Large Attendance–Byesville News Letter

Byesville, Sept 16.__John Moravick was injured in Ideal mine at 9 o’clock Thursday night when he was caught by a fall of slate. He was badly bruised and scratched on the right side and leg.  It is thought he was not injured internally. The injured man was brought to his home on First street and a physician was called.

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The Jeffersonian, 24 Apr 1925 pg. 2  c. 6

Coal Miner Was Hurt In Mine

Pleasant City, April 24, Evan Morgan, while at work in the Walhonding mine had the misfortune to have one bone in his right leg broken Saturday.  He was taken to his home and Dr. D. F. Wallenfeltz was called.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 Mar 1929 pg. 1 c. 5

John Morsky Killed and John Stropki Fatally Hurt By Slate At Harryette

John Morsky, 44, was instantly killed, John Stropki, 42, was fatally crushed and George Kachila and Mike Liptock narrowly escaped death Tuesday night at 10:30 o’clock when a huge quantity of slate fell at Harryette mine of the National Coal Co.

Morsky was almost decapitated.  His head was crushed to a pulp, right arm broken, chest crushed and right leg broken in five places. Stropki was crushed about the right side and one leg was broken in two places. Internal injuries caused his death.

Stropki and Kachila were machine men, while Morsky and Liptock were loaders. All were working in the same room in the mine.

Robert Gollop, Byesville, deputy state mine inspector, and Charles Aston, superintendent of Harryette mine, made an investigation of the accident Wednesday. They estimated that 15 tons of slate had fallen in the room where Morsky and Stropki were crushed. The room in which the men were working had recently been posted, but the weight of the rock which broke loose from the top was too heavy for the supports, causing them to crumble, it is said.

Coroner Robins questioned witnesses Wednesday to the accident.  His verdict has not been announced.

At the time the rock fell, Stropki and Kachila were cutting coal in the room where Morksy and Liptock were employed. While the cutters were working on the machine, the loaders were watching the operations.  The men were trapped in the small inclosure and had no chance to escape.

Almost without warning the debris crashed to the floor of the mine.  There was a cracking sound and an instant later the slate fell.  Morsky and Stropki were unable to leap to a place of safety before they were struck down. With a thundering crash the debris came down from the roof of the mine.

The rock measured approximately  10 square feet and weighed several tons.

Kachila, and Liptock were stunned by the suddenness of the tragedy that had befallen their comrades, but worked heroically to rescue them. Stropki and Morsky were buried under the fallen stone and it was neces-

(Continued on Page Twelve)

27 Mar 1929 pg. 12 c. 3

John Morsky Killed By Slate

(Continued From Page One)

sary to break it up before it could be removed from their bodies.  Other men in the mine hurried to the scene and aided in the rescue work.

Morsky was dead when his body was extricated and Stropki was mortally injured, Dr. Henry Wells gave first aid to Steripki and he was placed in an ambulance.  His death occurred as the ambulance was racing along Woodlawn avenue to Wells hospital.

The bodies of the two victims were removed to a local morgue, where they were viewed by Coroner Robins.  Kachila and Liptock escaped being struck by the falling slate by inches.

Harryette mine of the National Coal company resumed operations about a month ago, working under authority granted by Judge B. W. Hough in federal court, the properties of the company being involved in receivership with W. J. McFarlin Cleveland, as receiver.  All of the men were experienced in mining and had been working since the mine reopened.

The accident is the worst that has marred the operations of the Cambridge mines since they were reopened almost one year ago.  It was the second similar accident of the day as Steve Dragon, Caldwell, was seriously injured Tuesday morning by a fall of slate in Caldwell mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co. Stropki is married and has six children.  Morsky had no known relatives in Guernsey county.

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The Jeffersonian, 29 Aug 1901 pg. 3 C. 3

Chas. H. McCollum, a miner employed in the Klondyke mines, was caught by a fall of slate Thursday afternoon and injured about the hips and legs. He also suffered a number of cuts about his head.  The injured man is a member of the Cambridge I. O. R. M. Lodge and is well known in this city.

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The Jeffersonian, 5 Oct 1938 pg. 6 c. 5

Miner Is Injured

Corb McConagha, North Seventh street, Byesville, had his right are badly bruised and cut Monday morning while working in the Byesville Coal Company mine, formerly known as McFarland mine.  Although his condition is reported satisfactory, Mr. McConagha will be confined to his home several days.

The accident is reported to have occurred when a coal car jumped the track and pinned him against the wall of the mine. Fellow workmen, uninjured in the accident, assisted Mr. McConagha.  His condition is not serious.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 21 Mar 1918 Pg. 6 C. 3

Seriously Injured

John McElroy, Jr. was seriously injured in the Trail Run mine Monday when he was caught between the mine cars, caused by the runaway of a mule Dr. Patton was called.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 25 May 1905, pg. 5, c. 5

Miner Killed

James McLaughlin, a coal miner employed in the Midway mine near the Old Cambridge Baptist church, was caught by a fall of slate while working in the mine Mon. morning and almost instantly killed, and James Warne, another miner who was working with McLaughlin at the time was so badly injured that it is not thought that he can live.

McLaughlin lived but a few minutes after the accident. Warne was badly injured about the breast and hip and his right leg was laid bare from the hip to the ankle. Mr. McLaughlin was about fifty years of age and is survived by a wife and large family.  Mr. Warne is about forty years old.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 Jan 1922 pg. 5 c. 3

Motorman Killed In Murray Mine

Earl Munyon, age 19 years, motorman in the Murray mine of the National Coal Company, was almost instantly killed Thursday night at 11 o’clock when crushed between the motor and timbers of the mine.

The exact manner in which Mr. Munyon met death is not known, but employes who were near the scene of the accident Thursday night, a few minutes before his body was discovered, believe he leaned from the side of the motor while it was in motion, possibly to inspect part of the mechanism.

The young man’s head was terribly crushed, but he was alive when found by fellow workmen. The body was carried to the entrance of the mine and Dr. Patton, of Byesville was called.  Death, however had occurred before the arrival of the physician.

Mr. Munyon’s body was removed to the Herlan morgue in Byesville where it was viewed by Coroner ? Bates who ordered it prepared for burial.   An inquest will be conducted to ascertain the manner in which the young man was killed.  Mr. Munyon lived near the mine with his brother and has been employed as motorman for some time.

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The Jeffersonian, 9 Dec 1915 pg. 1 c. 3

Back Broken By Fall Of Stone

Byesville, Dec 9, Melvin Nicholson, 31, of Fourth street was seriously injured at the Ideal mine of the Cambridge Collieries Coal at 1 o’clock today, by a fall of stone, commonly known in the miners as a wheel.

Dr. J. E. Patton and Conner’s ambulance were called. Mr. Nicholson’s injuries are thought to be fatal, as he was hurt internally and his back was broken.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 18 Jan 1912 pg. 5 c. 3

Kicked In The Face By A Mule

John Noble, of Guernsey, east of the city, was kicked in the face and on top of his head by a mule, at the Midway mine, of the Cambridge Collieries Co., Tuesday morning, the first blow knocking out five teeth, besides cutting his face in a very painful manner, and the second blow, on top of the head, narrowly missed a point, that would have caused death.

Mr. Noble is employed as a driver and at the time of the accident had entered the stable to get the mule, when the animal let fly both hind feet. The man was brought to the office of Dr. W.G. W. Hixon, where the injuries were dressed.

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The Jeffersonian, 17 Jan, 1933 pg. 5 c. 5

Miners Dig Coal To Rescue Man

James Oakley, 54, of Cambridge R. D. 7 was seriously injured at 9 o’clock Tuesday morning while working in Murray Hill mine of the Akron Coal Co., when he was caught between a cutting machine and a rib of coal.

His pelvis was fractured on both sides and he was crushed through the abdomen.  Dr. H. R. Neeland, of Cambridge attended him and had him removed to Wells hospital here.  Oakley was imprisoned for several minutes between the heavy cutting machine and the coal.  Fellow workmen found it impossible to move the machine and set to work releasing the pinioned man by digging coal out of the rib back of him.  Finally a space large enough to permit his removal was hacked away. He suffered intensely during this procedure.  X-ray examination at the hospital revealed the fracture of the pelvis.  It is not known how badly vital organs in the abdomen were crushed and his condition is regarded as critical.

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The Jeffersonian, 23 Feb 1905 pg. 3 c. 4

Killed By Fall Of Slate

Stephen Oioch, a Hungarian coal miner, aged about 35 years, employed in the mines at Ava, was caught by a fall of slate while at work in the mine Tuesday.  Receiving injuries which resulted in his death a short time afterwards.  Coroner W. R. Yeo was notified of the accident and death and went to Ava Wed Morning to view the remains and take the testimony of witnesses. A wife and three children are left in Austria.

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The Jeffersonian, 5 Dec 1934 pg. 1 c. 6

Explosion Of Dynamite Kills Senecaville Man

Body of Michael Olehavsky Is Almost Severed By Blast

Force Of Charge Strikes In Stomach

Senecaville, O., Dec. 4—The Body of Michael Olehavsky, 46, well known local citizen, was almost severed at the waist at 5:30 o’clock Tuesday evening when a charge of dynamite he had just placed in a drill hole exploded prematurely in Rigby mine of the Akron Coal Co.

The full force of the dynamite charge struck him in the stomach, chest and head.  One side of his face was torn away, a gaping cavity in his chest was opened and his abdomen was horribly lacerated. Death resulted instantly.  Olehavsky was working alone in an entry of the mine. Fellow employes hearing the blast rushed to the scene and found his mutilated body.

It is believed he was tamping the dynamite in the hole when the charge exploded as the percussion cap had not been set in place.  Olehavsky was a highly respected miner.  He was a  native of Czecho-Slovakia but had resided in this community for many years, being a member of the Greek Orthodox Catholic church at Lore City, which he served as treasurer for over 15 years.

In addition to his widow he is survived by six sons, Mike, Joe, Andy, Gus, Amel and Charles, all of the home; his aged parents and four brothers in Czecho-Slovakia.

His body was removed to the Corwin undertaking establishment.  Funeral services will be held Friday morning at the home at 10:30 o’clock with additional services at the Lore City church. Burial will be made in the Senecaville cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 1 Feb 1929 pg. 1  c. 7

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate

Byesville, Feb 1—William Orr, aged about 60 years, of Race avenue Byesville, was instantly killed by a fall of slate in the Ideal mine Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock. The body was removed to the Harlan morgue.

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The Jeffersonian, 19 Dec 1923 pg. 2 c. 1

George Patchin, Driver in Trail Run Mine No. 2, Was Instantly Killed Tuesday Afternoon

Byesville, Dec. 19—George Patchin, of Trail Run, driver at Mine No. 2, was run down by a car of coal and instantly killed Tuesday afternoon, the head and body being badly crushed. The body was taken to the Herlan morgue where it was prepared for burial, and was later taken to the home of his cousin at Trail run.  He leaves to mourn his death a father, mother and several brothers and sisters living in Akron.

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The Jeffersonian, 29 Feb 1916 pg. 1 c. 7

Loader Killed In Ideal Mine

Byesville, Feb 29__Joe Paulishock employed as a loader in the Ideal mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co., was caught between a car and a post Tuesday and so badly crushed about the chest that he died while he was being removed from the mine.  Coroner Lawyer was notified.

Paullshock was about 45 years of age and leaves his wife and five children.  The family lives at Stop No. 9.

There were no witnesses to the accident but it is supposed the man was moving an empty car which got away from him, and in order to stop it he attempted to place a sprag in the spokes of one of the wheels and was caught between the car and post. The body was removed to Conner’s undertaking establishment.

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The Jeffersonian, 17 Sept 1920 pg. 10 c. 1

Obituaries

Mr. Emanuel Peach

Emanuel Peach, who was born in Linton, Derbyshire, England, March 3, 1874, departed this life at his home in Lore City, Sept. 8, age 46 years, six months and five days.  He was united in marriage to Mrs. Lizzie Burns Adams in 1903, at Cambridge.  He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, the following children, Mrs. Harry Dunfee and Mrs. Malcolm McNeil, of Lore City, Mrs. Henry Finley and Mrs. Arthur Bauer, of Canton, Mrs. Wayne Carpenter, of Akron, Mr. William B. Adams of Cadiz, Frances, Samuel, Kenneth, Alexander and Harry all of the home, His aged parents Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Peach, of Senecaville.  The following brothers and sisters; Messrs. James, Richard and Frank, of Senecaville, Mr. William Peach, of Follansbee, W. Va., Mrs. Fannie Sellers, of Zanesville, Mrs. Marie Hopps, of Walhonding, Miss Alice Peach of Senecaville, and Mrs. Edna Overaenil of Roundup Mont. Also ____  grandchildren and a host of friends.  Mr. Peach was injured in the Goodyear mine the 30th of July, suffering a broken back.  During his five weeks of suffering he was always patient and never complained.

Mr. Peach will be greatly missed in his home, as well as among a great circle of friends, as he was ever ready to help anyone in need, and to stand for the right of his fellow workingmen.  He was a member of the K. of P. lodge of Senecaville, the I. O. O. F. lodge of Lore City, the Encampment of Cambridge, the Forresters of Murray City.

Funeral services were held at the Presbyterian church at Lore City, sept. 11th, conducted by Rev. Mr. Dean and Rev. Mr. Simpson.  Interment in Senecaville cemetery.

The charmed circle broken; A dear face

Missed day by day from its accustomed place

But, cleaned, and saved, and perfected, by grace

One more in heaven;

One less at home.

One voice of welcome hushed, forever more

One farewell  word unspoken; on the shore

Where parting comes’ one soul landed more

One more in heaven.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 21 Mar 1918 Pg. 6 C. 3

Miner Injured

Robert Penman of Peters avenue, was seriously injured by a fall of slate at the Puritan mine Monday.  He sustained a fracture of the spine and compound fracture of the left leg.  He was removed by Conner’s ambulance to the Pennsylvania depot and taken to the Bethesda hospital at Zanesville.

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Guernsey Times, 15 Aug 1919 pg. 1 c. 2

Coal Car Crushes 15-Year Old Boy To Death In Mine

Arden Pennell Killed Thursday While at Work For Morris Coal Company

Senecaville, O., Aug. 14—Crushed by an empty coal car while at work in the Senecaville mine of the Morris Coal Company, about 1 p.m. Thursday, Arden Pennell fifteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Con Pennell of Senecaville died at this home one hour later.

Young Pennell had been employed as a trapper in the mine for the past two months. The impact of the car striking the lad crushed his body and broke both legs. Fellow workmen hurried to the scene and carried the boy to the mouth of the mine where first aid was rendered. The boy was then taken to the home and Dr. Craig was called. It was found that young Pennell had been internally injured. He died within one hour.

The deceased was a member of the Presbyterian church and had a large circle of friends. Coroner Dr. C. Bates was notified. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 18 Jan 1900 Pg. 3 Col. 3

Carlos Peters

An Employe at the Walhonding Mines, Pleasant City, Killed Tuesday Morning.

Carlos Peters, a young man, aged about 23 years, was caught between a car and the cage at the Walhonding mines, Pleasant City, about 8:0 o’clock Tues, morning and so seriously injured that he died before help could reach him.

At the time of the accident Mr. Peters was at the bottom of the shaft engaged in putting loaded cars in the cage and after getting the cage loaded he attempted to start it but in some manner became fastened and he tried to start the car with a bar of iron.  Suddenly the car started and the iron bar flew back striking him just below the heart.  His fellow workmen heard him make a noise but before they reached him he was dead. He was carried out of the mine and taken to his home.  Coroner Vorhies was notified and viewed the remains this afternoon. All the miners employed at the Walhonding now regard mine as hoo-doo because so far this year two men have been killed and on other probably fatally injured.  Peters leaves a wife but no children. Thede Davis, who was injured in the Walhonding mines is still alive but there is hardly any hopes for his recovery.

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The Jeffersonian, 9 Jan 1923 pg. 1 c. 8

Fall Of Slate Killed Miners

Garvin S. Peters, 920 Gomber avenue, and George Weston, of Four Mile hill were buried beneath a fall of slate in Elm tree mine of the Cambridge Glass Company, east of Cambridge, and instantly killed Tuesday afternoon at 1 o’clock.

The horrible accident occurred as the men were cutting coal in a room of the mine. Several tons of slate fell without warning, crushing the men to death. Timbers in the room of the mine were the tragedy took place were splintered by the mass of falling stone.

The bodies of the men were hidden from view by the huge amount of stone which fell upon them.  Miners immediately formed a rescue party and worked heroically in an effort to reach the men, but were handicapped because of the hazard from loosened stone.

It was necessary for the rescue party to timber up the roof before the bodies could be extracted from the debris.  More for the lives of the men was held out until the last by those who were in the mine.

Physicians were rushed to the mine and two motor ambulances of the D. M. Stevens undertaking establishment made a fast run to the scene, but the victims lives had been snuffed out.

Employes of the mine tenderly carried the bodies of their unfortunate companions to the surface where they were placed in the ambulances and removed to the Stevens morgue. Both men were terrible crushed.

Removal of the bodies from the mine was a pathetic scene and many friends of the dead men were unable to restrain their feelings and wept.

At the Stevens morgue the bodies were viewed by Coroner C. bates who ordered them prepared for burial.

Messer’s. Peters and Weston are widely known in mining circles of Guernsey county and their many acquaintances extend condolence to the bereaved families. Mr. Peters had worked as a machine man in mines in Guernsey county for many years. He is survived by his widow and one son.

Mr. Weston leaves a widow and three children. A few weeks ago Mr. Weston’s father was seriously crushed by a fall of slate in Elm Tree Mine but a short distance from the scene of Tuesday’s tragedy. He was discharged from the Lawrence hospital on New Year’s day, but has not yet fully recovered from his injuries.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 18 Jun 1896, pg. 3, c. 2

George Poland, who was so badly injured in Scott’s mine some time ago died at 11 o’clock Wed. Mr. Poland was about 18 years of age and his death will be a sad blow to his parents. George was well known in the neighborhead in which he resided and was well liked by all.  The funeral was held Thursday at 3 o’clock at Center.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 15 Jan 1903, pg. 2, c. 3

John C. Pollock.

This city and community were never more profoundly stirred than by the report on Tuesday of the probably fatal injury received by John C. Pollock in the Derwent mines soon after noon.  It was sincerely hoped that his injuries would not prove fatal, but the crushing weight of four tons of coal upon his body was too great to leave hope and he died soon after being brought to his home, at about 5 o’clock.

As soon as possible after the fall he was rescued by his fellow workmen and brought by special train to Cambridge, thence in a sled to his home two miles west, of the city.  He was met at Byesville by his son, Arthur and accompanied home.  Physicians were summoned and everything done that could be done to relieve his sufferings.

Mr. Pollock was a great excellent man, a devoted, earnest, working christian from boyhood, a kind neighbor, a model father and husband, a quiet, sensible, dignified citizen of more than ordinary intelligence and comprehension of public affairs, an excellent instructor, a perfect American gentleman.

He leaves a wife and three sons and two daughters. The children are Arthur, a prominent business man of Byesville, holding a very important position with the Wills Creek Coal Company; Mrs. Edna Moore, wife of Karl Moore, of Louisville, Ky.  Miss pearl and two young sons, Roy and Halsey, at home.  They are all members of church and follow the example of their christian father in active usefulness in christian living.

For many years Mr. Pollock was a leading member and deacon of the Old Cambridge Baptist church, superintendent of the Bible school and generally regarded as a model superintendent.  After removing to Cambridge he and his family became members of the Baptist church of the city, was soon after elected deacon, assistant treasurer and assistant superintendent of the Sunday School where he instructed a large class of women.

In all his relations to the home, to the church, to society and to the state he was conscientious, earnest, active, loyal and true.

Few men can leave such a clean, worthy record behind them after an active life of 53 years, few men could be more missed or more sincerely mourned than John Calvin Pollock. Funeral services will be held in the baptist church in Cambridge on Thursday at 1 o’clock afternoon. Interment in Northwood cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 3 Sept 1903, pg. 3, c. 3

Killed by Fall of Slate

Iven Powell, aged 22 years, of Long Bottom, Meigs county, O., was caught by a fall of slate in the Little Kate mine at Lucasburg, near Byesville, Friday day, sustaining injuries which resulted in his death about an hour later.

The young man had been visiting the family of J. E. Stephenson, who resides on the Witten farm, near Byesville.  He had never been in a coal mine and accepted an invitation from Mr. Stephenson to accompany him and his son on  a trip in the mine.  Hardly had Mr. Stephenson turned his back when the fall of slate and coal took place, catching young Powell.  The injured man was taken from the mine and carried to a nearby house where he died about  an hour later.

Mr. Powell was single and lived with his parents in Meigs county where the remains were sent. He had made many friends during his short visit and his death was a sad blow to all.

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Guernsey Times, 25 Aug 1919 c. 1 & 2

Thomas W. Price, aged 47 years, of Morton avenue, was instantly killed, James Stillions, aged 23, of Old Washington, was seriously injured, and Andy Sedorsan, of Four Mile Hill, was slightly injured when a section of the roof of the Forsythe mines caved in Saturday morning.

A quantity of slate fell in the mine Friday night and Saturday morning the miners were assisting in cleaning up and raising props under he places where parts had fallen when, without warning, a section of the roof gave away, crushing Price to the ground. Death was instantaneous.  Stillions, while running from the slate, received a fractured leg and was cut about the lower section of the body.  Seodorsan received only a few minor injuries.

The injured men were carried to the entrance of the mine and Dr. C. R. Johnson of Cambridge and Dr. Thompson of Old Washington were called. When it was found that Mr. Price had been killed, Dr. C. Bates, coroner, was called, and after viewing the body, ordered it prepared for burial. Seodorsan was taken to his home, while Stillions was removed to the Cambridge hospital in the McCreary ambulance.

The body of Mr. Price was removed to Stevens’ morgue on South Eighth street in Stevens ambulance and prepared for burial. Thomas W. Price was well known in Cambridge, where he had resided for a number of years, having moved here from Pleasant City.  He was a member of the Point Pleasant lodge F. and A. M. of Pleasant City and Cambridge Lodge NO. 301 I. O. O. F.

The deceased is survived by his wife, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Price of Lore City, and the following children: Mrs. William Calvert and Mrs. Bert Christian, of Buffalo, Mrs. Stella Gibbons of Iowa, Herbert and Thomas of Cambridge, Ernest, Wilbur, Edward, Florence and Vera Price, who live at home. Two sisters, Mrs. J. N. Ferren of Cambridge R. D., and Mrs. Caroline Keyber of Pittsburgh, also survive.

Funeral services will be held at the home Tuesday at 2 P. M. Burial will be made in Senecaville.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 Nov 1926 pg. 1 c. 5

Miner Killed by Fall of Slate

__At Senecaville

Senecaville, O., Nov. 27—William Purdum, 55, an employe of Cleveland mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co., was crushed to death Saturday morning at 7:30 o’clock by a fall of slate.  The mine had started operations but a few minutes Saturday morning when the accident occurred.  He had for many years been employed at Cleveland mine.

Mr. Purdum was a timberman and upon entering the pit Saturday morning was told that a room needed posting.  Going to the place where the slate was reported as hazardous, Purdum stepped into the room to sound the top.  The instant he struck the slate it fell, bearing him to the ground.  His body and head were badly crushed and he was dead before miners who were nearby were able to remove the debris.  The body was removed to the home.

Mr. Purdum was thoroughly familiar with the interior of Cleveland mine and was skilled in timbering.  He was considered a careful workman.

His father, Wesley Purdum, met tragic death here several years ago.  He was assisting in building a road from the public square to the R. and O. depot and had been using dynamite to remove rock from the thoroughfare.  A stick of the explosive was being placed in a hole for blasting purposes when it exploded, killing him instantly.

Mr. Purdum was a lifelong resident of Senecaville and had a wide circle of friends here.

He had for many years been a member of the M. E. church.

Surviving are his widow and three children, Misses Francis and Sarah Purdum, of the home, and Wesley Purdum, a student at Meredith Business College, Zanesville.  Mrs. Emma Hutton, of Cambridge, and Mrs. Gaston, of Byesville, are sisters.  He also has a sister living in Colorado.

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Guernsey Times, 27 Oct 1914 pg. 1 c. 4

Was Crushed To Death By Mass Coal

William Rainey Victim IN Harryette Mine.

Was Operating Machine When Accident Occurred

Prop Fell, Removing Support From Coal Above—Leave Wife And Family

William Mansel Rainey, aged 33 years, was killed by a fall of coal in the Harryette mine of the National Coal Company three miles west of Byesville Monday evening at 6:30 o’clock.

Mr. Rainey was employed in the mine as a machine man and was working on the night turn. He had gone to work at 3:30 o’clock and was at work in his room when from some cause yet to be determined a prop fell letting a great mass of coal down upon him, crushing his chest. Other men working near by hurriedly removed the coal but the man was dead when taken out.

He was removed from the mine and taken to Byesville in the Conner ambulance where Coroner W. M. Lawyer viewed the body and ordered it prepared for burial.

The deceased was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Rainey and lived on his father’s farm near the Cambridge County Club.   He engaged in farming during the summer and worked in the mine during the winter months.

Besides his parents the deceased is survived by his wife and three daughters, the youngest of which is a year old.  The deceased is also survived by four brothers and two sisters who live in the west.  Another sister, Mrs. Taylor, and her husband, recently arrived at her father’s home to take care of the place while her parents spent the winter in Florida.

The deceased was a member of the Old Cambridge Baptist church and of the Masonic lodge. The arrangements for the funeral have not been made. Coroner Lawyer stated last night that he would probably hold the inquest some time this week.

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The Jeffersonian, 15, Oct 1934 pg. 8 c. 4

Injuries Are Fatal To William Ramage.

Byesville, Oct. 15—Injuries sustained Thursday at noon in Buffalo mine resulted in the death of William Ramage, 80, Sunday afternoon at 2:15 o’clock, at the Little clinic hospital here.  He suffered internal injuries and a fractured leg.  He was employed as a driver, and the accident occurred when he fell beneath a mine car.  Surviving are his widow, Mrs. May Ramage; two daughters, Gaynell and Laura, of the home; his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Ramage, of Byesville; two half-brothers, Bertal Welch, of Cambridge, and Clarence Welch, of Byesville, and one half-sister, Mrs. Paul Patterson, of Akron.  HE was a member of the M. P. church, Byesville.

Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the M. P. church, by the pastor, Rev. Cottrill.  Interment will be made in Northwood cemetery, Cambridge.

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Guernsey Times, 2 Sept 1918 pg. 1 c. 3-4-5

Miner Caught By Heavy Fall Of Slate in Blue Bell Mine and Instantly Killed

Ephriam Reeves, of Pleasant City, was instantly killed in the Blue Bell mine of the Cambridge Collieries Company, Saturday morning when he was caught by a fall of slate.  The accident is thought to have occurred about 10:30 o’clock, but the victim was not found for three hours later. The men at the mine finished their work on Saturday at noon and when it was noticed that Mr. Reeves did not come to the surface men went in search of him and found his feet protruding from a great mass of slate.

The body was not recovered until 8:30 o’clock Saturday night, wand was found to be badly mangled, the head being crushed and the back broken. The body was removed to the home at Pleasant City, Saturday night where it was viewed by Coroner Lawyer, Sunday. The coroner has not set the date for the inquest.

Mr. Reeves was 55 years old and had been a resident of Pleasant City for a number of years. He had been employed at this mine for several years and was regarded as a careful workman.

The deceased is survived by his wife and four children.

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The Jeffersonian, 18 Sept 1923 pg. 5 c. 6

Falling Slate Crushed Miner

Nick Revel, of near Blue Bell, was seriously crushed by a fall of slate in Maple Leaf coal mine Monday night at 8 o’clock.  He was mining coal in the entry when the debris fell, crushing him about the shoulders and body.

The McCreary & Connor invalid coach was called and removed the injured man to the Lawrence hospital where he was attended by Dr. W. W. Lawrence.  His condition Tuesday appeared to be somewhat improved, however, the extent of his injuries could not be determined.

Mr. Revel was the second miner injured in the mines in the southern end of Guernsey county Monday by slate falling as George Gourgous, of Pleasant City, was fatally crushed Monday morning in Walhonding mine.

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Guernsey Times, 2 Oct 1914 pg. 1 c. 5

Slate Fall Crushed Out Boy’s Life

Orville Reynolds Victim At Black Top Mine

Father and Brother Escaped Injury

Head Was Crushed To a Pulp And Was Dead When Slate Was Removed

Orville Reynolds, the sixteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Reynolds, was Instantly killed at the Black Top mine of the Morris Coal Company Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Young Reynolds was assisting his father and brother in loading coal in a mine car. The car had been filled and the men were waiting for a motor to remove it. Orville was standing with his hands on the rear of the car when tons of slate fell from above him, completely burying him and the car.  His father and brother had left the car shortly before the slate fell and escaped injury.

Other men employed in the mine assisted the father and brother in removing young Reynolds from the debris. When he was gotten out it was found that his head had been crushed to a pulp and that both arms were broken at the wrist.

The body was removed from the mine and taken to the Reynolds home near the mine, when it was viewed by Coroner W. M. Lawyer. The coroner stated he would hold an inquest next week.

Reynolds was an industrious young man and had many friends in the neighborhood where he resided. The arrangements for the funeral have not been announced.

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The Jeffersonian, 13 Nov 1935 pg. 1 c. 4

Miner Falls Dead While At Work

Lonnie Henry Riffle, 45, Cambridge R. D. 4, employed at the J. E. Burris coal mine the past 15 years, fell dead while at work in the mine Wednesday afternoon shortly after 12:30 o’clock.

His brother-in-law, James Burris, working nearby, saw the man slump over as he was drilling a hole preparatory to shooting coal, and ran to his side.  After applying artificial respiration and cold water to his face, Mr. Burris summoned assistance of other men working in the mine and they carried Mr. Riffle to the surface.

Dr. F. C. Huth was summoned and pronounced him dead after an examination. Death was thought to have been instantaneous. The body was removed to the McMillen and Scott funeral home, where an inquest was conducted Wednesday afternoon by the coroner, R. M. Dix.  Upon leaving him home for work

(Continued on page eight)

13 Nov 1935 pg. 8 c. 4

Miner Fall Dead

(Continued from Page One)

Wednesday morning. Mr. Riffle was reported to have been in his usual health and made no complaint.  He had been employed as a miner about 20 years and his death is a distinct shock to relatives, friends and acquaintances.

The deceased, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Riffle, was born March 25, 1890, at Point Pleasant, W. Va. He came to Guernsey county over 18 years ago and had since lived here.  In 1917 he united in marriage with Lena Ellen Burris and to this union three daughters and one son were born, Stella, Dorothy, Betty and Clifford, all of the home, who survive, in addition to his widow.  Three brothers also survive; John, Columbus; Jake, Heights, W. Va.; James Riffle, United States navy, now located in the east.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 6 Jul 1905, pg. 1, c, 2

The Injuries Of Roberts Prove Fatal.

Deceased Carpenter Succumbs to Terrible Sufferings.

Robert C. Roberts, who was injured Monday while at work on the tipple of the new mine for the Puritan Coal Co. on the Riddle farm one half mile southwest of Byesville, died at his home on South 8th street, about half an hour after being brought to this city Monday afternoon.

For sometime Mr. Roberts, who was a carpenter, had been employed with others in erecting the tipple at the new mine, and at the time of the accident he was near the top when without a moment’s warning the structure collapsed, throwing him to the ground and one of the largest of the timbers falling on his hips and legs.  He was crushed about the hips and both legs from the hips to knees.

Dr. Patton, of Byesville, was called and after doing all he could to relieve his sufferings, ordered that the injured man be brought to his home in this city.  Dr. Patton telephoned Dr. Harrison of the accident stating that Mr. Roberts would be brought here on the 2 o’clock car and asked that an ambulance be ready to remove him to his home. This was done but the patient was too seriously injured to recover and died in about half an hour after arriving home.  Besides the injuries noted above Mr. Roberts was also injured internally.

Mr. Roberts was born in St. Augustine, Fla., and was about 50 years of age.  He had been living in Cambridge for the past seven years, coming here from Barnesville.  A widow and two daughters, one 12 years and the other 16 years old, are left to mourn his death.  Deceased was a member of the Cambridge K. of P. lodge as well as belonging to the Carpenters Union.   The funeral services will be held at the U. R. church this evening at 4 o’clock, conducted by the pastor Rev. W. S. White.  Interment at the South cemetery. The services will be under the auspices of the K. of P. lodge.

In connection with the death of Mr. Roberts we learned this morning of a remarkable incident which is worthy of psychological study.  His twelve year old daughter Bessie, was visiting her aunt, Mrs. Chas. Livingston, at Zanesville, last week and one night dreamed that she had returned home and that her father had died two days later.  Becoming worried, she cut her visit short returning to Cambridge Saturday night only to have her sad dream realized.  Mrs. Livingston is now with the bereaved family.

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The Jeffersonian, 11 Oct 1921 pg. 1 c. 7

Chas. Robinson Killed In Mine

Four Cambridge Men Also Injured in Accident at Murray Hill

Charles Robinson, aged about 20 years, of Kipling, was instantly killed and Albert Valentine, C. H. Collins, John Rehosky and William Collins all of Cambridge, were badly injured in the Murray Hill Mine, of the Akron Coal Co., Monday afternoon at 4:15 o’clock, when the car in which the men were riding from the room to the entrance, collided with a motor which had been left standing at the bottom of a steep incline.

Mr. Robinson was driving the car in which the men were riding. His head and chest were crushed, and left arm broken, causing instant death. The other men were cut and bruised about their bodies, but their injuries were not serious. Dr. H. R. Neeland, the Akron coal Co, surgeon, was called and dressed the injuries of the four Cambridge men.

Coroner Bates was notified of the accident and viewed the remains of Mr. Robinson at the mine. An inquest will be held later. All of the injured men were removed to their

(Continued on Page Eight)

Pg. 8 c. 2

(Continued from Page One)

Homes in this city and Tuesday morning were reported as resting as well as could be expected.

The men had been working in the mine during the day and jumped in the car to ride to the entrance. Mr. Robinson was in charge of the car and did not see the motor until it was too late to avoid the accident.

Charles Clementine Robinson was born in Byesville, May 15, 1902, and was well known in that city and in Cambridge.  He had lived at Kipling for a number of years.  He is survived by his parents, one brother, Leonard, and sever sisters, Mrs. John Williams, of Cambridge; Mae, Nellie, Nancy, Florence, Elizabeth and Lucille, of the home. The funeral services will be held in the Methodist Episcopal church in Lore City. Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Mr. Spurrier.

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The Jeffersonian, 17 May 1917 pg. 8 c. 5

Fall Of Slate Killed Miner

John Roboik, age 34 years, was almost instantly killed, while his partner T. Ponzana, escaped injury, Tuesday afternoon at 5 o’clock, when he was caught by a fall of slate, while at work in the Cleveland mine of the Morris coal company at Senecaville.  The two men had gone to work at 3:15 o’clock on the night shift, and at the time of the accident, were attempting to push a car of coal from their room when the slate fell without warning. Roboik was struck about the body, and was crushed to the ——?

Coroner W. M. Lawyer was called and made a preliminary investigation of the accident, Tuesday night, and his inquest will be held later. The deceased had made his home in Senecaville for some time. He is survived by his wife and five children.

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The Jeffersonian, 17 Jul 1929 pg. 1 c. 6

Mike Roby, aged 53, of East Cambridge, a loader employed at Black Top mine of the Morris Coal Co., near Lore City, was caught beneath a fall of slate at noon Wednesday and instantly killed.

He was crushed about the head and chest and fellow workmen labored for several minutes in extricating his body. The victim had lived in East Cambridge for many years and had been employed in the mines of this district for some time.

Mr. Roby is survived by his widow; two sons, John and Andrew, and one daughter Helen, of the home; also one sister, Mrs. Anna Sopko, of Ellerton, Pa.  He was a member of the Roman Catholic church at Byesville.

The body was brought to Cambridge and prepared for burial. Funeral arrangements will be announced later

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The Jeffersonian, 10 Jun 1930 pg. 1 c. 1

Miner’s Injuries Prove Fatal

Rufus Rogle, aged 52, of Klondyke, died at Wells hospital at 11:30 o’clock Tuesday morning as the result of internal injuries sustained at Murray Hill Mine of the Akron Coal Co., Monday morning when he was hit in the stomach by a lump of coal.

Fogle was working on top of a loaded coal car when he lost his balance and fell over the side of the car to the ground.  He alighted on his hands and knees and rolled over upon his back. As he did so a large lump of coal on the car, dislodged by his foot as he fell, dropped from the car and struck him in the stomach.

He was attended at the mine by Dr. Charles F. Shively, of Cambridge, after which he was removed to his home on Lore City R. D. 3.  His condition became worse Monday afternoon and later he was removed to Wells hospital.  Internal injuries were received by the severe blow in the stomach and Tuesday morning his condition quickly became serious.

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Guernsey Times, 17 Feb 1914 pg. 2 c. 5

Miner Injured

Jo Rusnak narrowly escaped serious injury and perhaps death Tuesday morning about 11 o’clock, then a heavy fall of slate crashed down in the part of Black Diamond mine where he was working. But for two loaded coal cars standing near by, the miner might have been crushed to death.

He is badly bruised about the back and hips, and will be unable to resume his work for a time. Dr. E. L. Lowthian dressed the injuries.

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The Jeffersonian, 5 Jun 1923 pg. 1 c. 6

Miner Is Killed By Fall Of Slate

Kuzma Rusnok, aged about 43 years, employed as a miner in the Harryette mine of the National Coal Co., near Byesville, was almost instantly killed by a fall of slate Tuesday morning at 11:30 o’clock. Rusnok was working alone in a room when caught by the slate.

Coroner Bates was notified of the accident and after viewing the body it was removed to the Stevens morgue and prepared for burial.

A number of other miners heard the slate fall and ran into the room. The slate was removed and the man started to carry Rusnok from the mine, but he died before reaching the entrance. Rusnok was single and has one brother living in this country.

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The Jeffersonian, 17 Aug 1920 pg.? c. 7

Miner Instantly Killed Saturday

Byesville, Aug. 16—Steve Schuhay, aged 53 years, was instantly killed at the Minnehaha mine Saturday at 10:30 o’clock when he was run over by a motor.  The body was removed to the Herlan undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.

The deceased is survived by his widow and three children, living at Redtown. Funeral services were held Monday and interment was made in the Mt. Zion cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 26 Mar 1949 pg. 2 c. 4

Injuries Fatal To Byesville Mine Boss

Andrew Sebak, 65, of 122 N. Tenth St., Byesville, mine boss at the McFarland mine of the Byesville Coal Co., died Saturday at 7:30 a. m. in St. Francis Hospital from injuries suffered Tuesday when run over by an eight-ton motor in the mine.

Mr. Sebak’s legs were so badly mangled by the wheels of the motor that amputation of both between the knee and ankle was necessary. The motor, running wild after leaving its trolley crashed through a door behind which the mine boss was standing.

Mr. Sebak was born Dec. 29, 1883 in Austria.  He came to the United States in 1898.  His wife, Barbara Hedegus Sebak, died in 1944.

He was a member of the Holy Trinity Catholic church of Byesville, the Holy Name Society and the Catholic Slovak Union. He served for many years as a member of the board of education of Jackson township.                                                                                                          Surviving are the following children; Mrs. Mary Kendicky of Byesville, with whom he had resided, Steve, of Byesville, Vincent of the home, Joseph, Mrs. Elizabeth Thur and Mrs. Anna Jaselium of Cleveland. Twelve grandchildren and four great-grandchildren also survive. Three sons are now deceased.

The body was taken to the McCracken funeral home and will be removed to the Kendicky residence Sunday morning. The Rosary will be recited Monday at 8 p. m. Rev. Fr. Stephen Laca will officiate at solemn requiem high mass Tuesday at 9:30 a. m. at Holy Trinity Catholic church.  Burial will be in Byesville cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday , 5 Apr 1906, pg. 3, c. 7

Badly Mashed By Falling Slate

Watson Selby Dies From Injuries Received while Working in Walhonding Mine.

Watson Selby, a coal miner of Pleasant City, employed in the Walhonding mines near that place, was caught by a fall of slate and coal while working Thursday and received injuries which later resulted in his death.

The sound of the falling slate attracted the attention of the other men in the mine and knowing that Selby was working near that point, they hurried forward expecting to see his mangled body beneath the slate.  Mr. Selby sustained a compound fracture of the left leg, the bone protruding through the flesh, and a number of cuts and bruises.

The injured man was taken to his home and a physician called, but his injuries were fatal, and he died at 9 o’clock Thursday night without having regained consciousness.  Mr. Selby was about 35 years of age and married.

Coroner W. B. Yeo was notified of the accident and death and went to Pleasant City to view the remains Friday morning.

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Guernsey Times, 24 Dec 1914 pg. 1 c. 2

Crushed Out Miners Life

John Semko, aged 22 years, was killed by a fall of slate in the Murray Hill mine of the Akron Coal company Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock.

The man was engaged in drawing props in an old room of the mine when the roof fell upon him crushing his right leg and arm and abdomen.  He was removed from the mine and taken to his home at Klondyke, where he died soon afterward.

The young man was a native of Hungary and had been in this country about eight years. He was married last August and is survived by his wife.

Coroner W. M. Lawyer was notified and viewed the body. He will hold an inquest Monday evening.

The funeral will be held Monday morning at 10 o’clock. The interment will be made at the Byesville cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 19 Sept 1923 pg. 8 c. 4

Miner Caught By Falling Slate

John Sevihra, 17, of Trail Run, was seriously crushed by a fall of slate in Trail Run mine of the Cambridge Collieries company Tuesday afternoon.  He was removed in the Herlan motor ambulance to the Cambridge hospital where he was attended by Drs. Patton and Swan.

Sevihra’s right ear was almost several and he suffered a compound fracture of the right leg below the knee and injuries about the back. His condition Wednesday was reported to be somewhat improved.

The accident was the third due to falling slate in the Guernsey valley coal field within two days.

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George Gourgous, of Pleasant City, was fatally crushed Monday by slate in Walhonding mine, and Nick Revel of near Blue Bell, was severely injured Monday evening by a fall of stone in the Maple Leaf mine.

Mr. Revel is receiving treatment at the Lawrence hospital and his condition is showing improvement.

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The Jeffersonian, 3 Jan 1917 pg. 1 c. 2

Miner’s Right Arm Was Torn Off By Loaded Coal Car

David Shatto age 40 years, of Little Kate Mine No. 1, was probably fatally injured Wednesday morning about 8 o’clock when he was run over by a loaded coal car, while at work in the Harryette mine of the National Coal company.

The injured man is employed as a loader, and at the time of the accident was at work with his son.  After loading the car with coal, Mr. Shatto told his son to remove the brakes and let it run down the steep grade from the room into the main track. The young man did as requested, while his father went to the front of the car, and after it had gained considerable speed, he attempted to sprag it with a large piece of wood. The next instant he tripped and fell under the wheels of the car, which passed over his right arm, grinding it off between the elbow and shoulder, and he was otherwise seriously injured.

The son rushed to his father’s assistance, and with the aid of other employes carried him to the entrance, and Dr. Danford of Dogtown, was called. Following an examination it was found that besides the loss of the right arm, Mr. Shatto had suffered a broken left leg above the knee, internal injuries, and a number of bruises and cuts about the body, and it is thought that his back was broken.

His injuries were dressed and he was removed to his home, and later was taken to the Cambridge City hospital.

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The Jeffersonian, 6 Jan 1917 pg. 1 c. 5

Injured Miner Died

David Shatto, who was fatally injured while at work in the Harryette mine of the National Coal company recently, died Saturday afternoon at 1:50 o’clock at the Cambridge hospital.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 9 Apr 1908 Pg. 4 C. 7

Remains Taken To Nelsonville.

The remains of Alonzo Shelton, the young coal miner who died at his home in Byesville from injuries received recently by a fall of coal and slate, were brought to this city this morning in a special car over the C.P.L & T. Co. and taken to Nelsonville for interment.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 21 Nov 1912 Pg. 5 c. 3

Fingers Badly Mashed

John Sherman of West Gomber Avenue, had the fingers of the right hand badly mashed while at his work at Forsythe’s mines Monday at 10 o’clock.  His hand was caught by falling slate.  A Physician was called and dressed the injuries which are painful.

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The Jeffersonian, 22 Dec 1923 pg. 1 c. 4

Back Broken By Fall Of Slate

Grant Sherrard, Timberman, Fatally Injured in Mapel Leaf Mine

Buffalo, O., Dec. 22—Grant Sherrard, aged 60 years, was caught by a fall of slate in the Maple Leaf mine, Friday morning, at 8:30 o’clock, suffering injuries which resulted in his death two hours later at the home of Watt James, at this place.

Mr. Sherrard was employed as a timberman in the Maple Leaf mine, which is owned by a Massillon company. His back was broken, right hip crushed and he suffered a compound fracture of the bones of the left leg below the knee. The injured man was carried from the mine to the James home and Dr. Wallenfeltz of Pleasant City, was called, but death resulted at 10:30 o’clock.

Mr. Sherrard is survived by his widow and three sons, Richard and Robert, of New Philadelphia, and Noble, who was employed with his father in the Maple Leaf mine.

Short funeral services were held at the home of Mr. James Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, following which the body was taken to New Philadelphia, where additional services are to be held and interment made.

Mr. Sherrard and family lived in Pleasant City for a number of years, recently moving to New Philadelphia.

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The Jeffersonian, 30 Mar 1936 pg. 1-2

Digs Coal For 30 Years Tho Helpless From Waist Down

Homer Shipman, 56, whose indomitable courage kept him alive after his back had been broken and who worked in a country coal mine for more than 30 years, although helpless from the waist down, died Monday morning at 1:10 o’clock at his home in Birmingham, Guernsey county, his death being attributed to complications caused by his physical impairment.

Mr. Shipman’s case of fortitude is one of the most laudatory on record in southeastern Ohio. In spite of his physical handicap he crawled for 30 years two miles to a coal mine in the vicinity of Birmingham, performed arduous tasks and then crawled home. In those years he reared a family of five children.

Defies Medical Opinion

Caught under a slate fall in a country mine in the Birmingham vicinity when a young man. Shipman’s back was broken. Physicians who       (Continued on Page Two)

(Continued from Page One)

Attended him declared he could not live as the spinal cord had been impaired. Shipman defied the opinion of all medical authorities and regained his health, although unable to use his legs.

It was before the workmen’s compensation law became effective and Shipman decided to resume his work as loader in the coal mine. Without means of transportation he crawled to his work. He would load coal equally as speedily as a man with normal use of all his faculties and at the close of the day’s work would crawl to his home. For more than 30 years Homer Shipman performed this unusual feat, developing powerful arms and shoulders.

Forced to Give Up

Last August he became seriously ill and had since been confined to his home. His condition became critical a week ago and death followed.

In addition to his widow, the deceased leaves five children, Mrs. Edith Cosgrove, Canton, Mrs. Martha Mathews, Gilmore; Mrs. Ina Felton, Canton, Ralph, of Birmingham, and Eugene, of the home, in addition to 14 grandchildren, one brother and five sisters. One daughter, Mrs. Gladys Cosgrove, and two sisters, preceded him in death.

Funeral services will be held at the home in Birmingham at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon in charge of Rev. George Peoples of the Hopewell M. E. church. Interment will be made in the church cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 27 Jan 1922 pg. 5 C. 2

Was Crushed By A Fall Of Slate

William Sickle, age 56 years, of Cambridge R. D. 10, was probably fatally crushed by a fall of slate in the Kimbolton mine of the Kimbolton Mining Company, at 9:30 o’clock Friday morning.  Mr. Sickles is an experience miner, but he was unable to escape from the falling mass Friday morning.  He was buried under about 600 pounds of slate which struck him across the back and hips.

Dr. Palmer, of Kimbolton, was called and made an examination and it is believed the injured man’s back was broken.  He was also crushed through the hips. The Stevens motor ambulance removed Mr. Sickles to the Cambridge hospital. The outcome of his injuries could not be determined Friday afternoon.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 18 Jan 1912 pg. 5 c. 5

Hand Painfully Crushed

Elza Sigman, employed at the Old Orchard Mine east of the city, met with a very painful accident Tuesday morning. While attempting to lift a heavy barrel of oil one end slipped, catching his right hand and mashing on the end of the middle finger. The hand was otherwise badly crushed and cut by the sharp edge of the barrel. Mr. Sigman came to the city and the injury was dressed by Dr. G.W. Nixon.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday , 12 July 1900, pg. 3, c. 5

Coroner Vorhies Makes His Report

Coroner Vorhies had reported the following verdicts:

Inquest of John A. Sigman, who died from injuries received at the Trail Run Mines.

After having heard the evidence, examined the body, I do find that the said deceased came to his death by shock and lost of blood as a result of an injury to the said John A. Sigman by having both of his legs crushed on the 13th day of June 1900, by being run over by cars that are in the control of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, and while in the act of trying to control a cut of said cars he was thrown under them on the Trail Run coal switch, and the accident was the result of negligence on the part of said Pennsylvania Co., as the brakes on part of the cars were in bad order, and it is known to them that cars placed on an incline coal switch have to be controlled by the use of proper brakes, in dropping cars down to the coal tipple.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday ,   13 Sept 1906, pg. 7, c. 1

Mine Claims Another Victim

Little Town of Ava Reports One Fatality And Serious Runaway, in Which Two Are Injured.

The miners of Guernsey county arrived another name to their long list of victims when John Sills age 42, was crushed to death by a fall of slate and coal in the Detroit mine  near Ava, South of Cambridge, Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.

Mr. Sills was working at the entrance in a break through, when the fall occurred and although a skillful miner and well served in the dangers that beset one of his calling he did not recognize his peril until too late.  Other miners were working near but could not reach the unfortunate man to render assistance, other then removing the body from the debris.

Mr. Sills had been engaged in mining all of his life and on account of his thorough understanding of the industry and held many responsible positions.  He was one of the foremost citizens of Ava, in every respect, an active member of the Methodist church and was a prominent of the Byesville lodge of American Mechanics, which order he joined before removing from that city to his new home.  He is survived by a wife and six children; by his mother, Mrs. Rebecca Sills, of Ava, the following brothers; James, of Ava, Samuel and Henry, of Byesville, Councilman A. O. Sills, of Cambridge; Mr. John Sharrock, of Quaker City, Mrs. C. F. Moore, of Homestead, Pa.

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The Jeffersonian, 3 Jul 1931 pg. 1 c. 6

Fall Of Slate Kills Miner

Andy Sklenar, Jr., aged 22, was instantly killed at 7:15 o’clock Thursday morning by a fall of slate in Rigby mine of the Akron Coal Co.  Fellow employes worked for several minutes extricating him from the debris.

The young man was employed as a loader and resided with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andy Sklenar, Sr., two miles northwest of Senecaville.  The body was removed to the home where funeral services will be held probably Saturday.  In addition to his parents he is survived by several brothers and sisters.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 26 May 1904, Pg. 5 C. 2

John Smitley, of Clay avenue, South Side, was caught by a fall of slate Friday afternoon while at work at King’s mines, and while the injuries were very painful it is not thought that they are of a serious nature.  The injured man was brought to this city on a freight train and taken to his home on Clay avenue.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 29 Jun 1905, Pg. 5 C. 5

Driver Fell Before Car.

And Was Killed.  Thomas Sobini the Victim.

Thomas Sobini, a Slavish man employed as a driver at the Murray Hill coal mine on the B. & O. road east of the city, met a horrible death Monday morning at about 9 o’clock by falling before his car, the wheels passing over his body causing injuries which resulted in almost instant death

Deceased was about twenty-three years of age, single and had been employed at the Murray Hill mine for some years.

Shortly before   9 o’clock Sobini had received his car loaded with coal and started on his trip to the mouth of the mine, without a thought of the fate he was to meet before he reached the end of his trip.  He had reached a point about midway from where he had started to the mouth of the mine when he suddenly lost his balance and with a scream fell before his car.  The car was running rapidly and before he could roll out of the way of danger the wheels were on him crushing his body and injuring him so badly that he died almost instantly.

Coroner Yeo was notified of the accident

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The Jeffersonian, 11 Sept 1930 pg. 1 c. 8

Blow Is Fatal To Frank Spaid

Walhonding Mine Carpenter Succumbs To Injuries Sustained Wednesday Afternoon

Frank Spaid, aged 58, of Buffalo, carpenter at Walhonding mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co., died at Wells hospital here Wednesday afternoon at 5:15 o’clock as the result of a fractured skull sustained at 3 o’clock at the mine when he was struck on the left temple by a heavy iron pulley.

With several other men Mr. Spaid was assisting in unloading steel mine cars from a railroad car.  The pulley was attached to a heavy I-beam which protruded from the tipple 35 feet above the railroad car.  A mine car had been hoisted and was being swung over to a waiting automobile truck when the spindle in the pulley snapped.  The wheel of the pulley, given added impetus by the weight of the mine car, descended with considerable force and crashed in almost the entire left side of Mr. Spaid’s skull.  He was taken to Wells hospital immediately where death resulted without regaining consciousness.

The accident victim was born and reared at Buffalo, the son of Jerry and Martha Spaid, and had been employed at Walhonding mine since early manhood.  He was highly respected by a large circle of friends and possessed a pleasing, Christian disposition.  Early in life he became a member of the M. E. church at Buffalo and was active in its affairs.  He was also a member of the pleasant City Masonic lodge No. 369, Cambridge chapter No. 53, R. A. M. and K. of P.

Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Lizzie Spaid; two daughters, Mrs. Marie Siddle of Cambridge, and Miss Reba of the home; one brother, Mahlon Spaid, Blaine avenue, Cambridge and one sister, Miss Marie Spaid, of Buffalo.

Funeral services will be conducted Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the M. E. church at Buffalo by Rev. Mullen and Rev. Forrest W. Hall. Burial will be made in Buffalo cemetery.

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Guernsey Times, 10 Oct 1914 pg. 1 c. 5

Fatal Hurt Result When Man Jumped

Arlie Spencer Meets Fatal Accident in Mine

Was Motorman At Minnehaha Mine

Brought To the Cambridge Hospital But Died While Surgeon’s Were Operating.

Arlie Spencer, the nineteen-year-old son of Lewis Spencer, of Jackson township, was so badly injured at the Minnehaha mine of the National Coal company seven miles southwest of this city, Friday afternoon, that he died at the Cambridge hospital last night at 8:40 o’clock.

Young spencer was employed as a motorman and was coming from the mine with a train of loaded cars when the accident occurred. In descending a grade as noticed that a trap door had not been opened and to avoid the wreck that would probably occur he jumped from the motor and was caught between a car and the rib of the mine. His right hip was crushed and he was injured internally.

Dr. R. L. Lothian was called and found that the man was badly hurt.  He called Conner’s ambulance from Byesville and Spencer was brought to the Cambridge hospital arriving here at 7:15 o’clock.

After the arrival at the hospital further examination was made by Dr. F.C. Huth and Dr. Lothian, who found that an operation was the only hope of saving the young man’s life. Spencer died in the operation.

Immediately after the death Coroner W. M. Lawyer was notified, viewed the body and ordered it prepared for burial. The coroner had not fixed the time for holding the inquest.

The deceased lived with his parents near the Buckeye mine. Besides his parents he is survived by a sister and two brothers.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 3 Mar 1904, pg. 5 c.2

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Spiker wish to express their heartfelt thanks to express their heartfelt thanks to the many friends and neighbors for their kindness in the sickness and death of their dear son, Edwin, and especially to the Sunday school of the Old cambridge Baptist church, his fellow workmen of Nicholson’s mines and to the I. P. of T. for their beautiful token of respect.

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The Jeffersonian, 22 Oct 1926 pg. 1 c. 4

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate—In McFarlin Mine

George Spechok, 37, of near Pleasant City, was instantly killed and Oscar Price, 38, was probably fatally crushed Friday morning, at 11 o’clock, by a fall of slate in McFarlin mine operated by the New Pocock Coal Co. Spechok was married and is the father of 12 children.

(Continued on Page Twelve)

22 Oct 1926 pg. 12 c. 4

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate

(Continued from Page One)

Mine when the slate fell, crushing both men to the ground.

Spechok and Price were buried under five tons of stone. The former’s skull was crushed to a pulp, neck broken, body and legs mangled, while his companion is thought to have sustained a broken back, severe cuts and bruises and probable internal injuries.

Fellow-workmen removed the debris and Dr. Wallenfelsz, of Pleasant City, gave first aid to Price, after which he was removed in the Stevens ambulance to the Wells hospital.  Little hope is entertained for his recovery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday ,  3 Mar 1904, pg. 6, c. 1

Edwin Spiker, the young man, aged about 15 years, who was injured while at work in the Nicholson mines Tuesday afternoon and taken to the City Hospital Wednesday for treatment, died there Fri. morning at about 4:30 o’clock.  The remains were prepared for burial at Bair’s undertaking establishment and will be taken to Ava Sunday morning where the funeral services will be held. The interment will be made in the cemetery there.

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The Jeffersonian, 29 Mar 1923 pg. 11 c. 4

Injuries Prove Fatal To Miner

Fatally crushed six weeks ago when caught in an electric pump in the Cleveland mine of the Akron Coal Company, Frank Stevens, age 67 years, of Senecaville, died Wednesday afternoon at 2:45 o’clock at the Cambridge hospital where he had been receiving attention since the accident.

Mr. Stevens was alone in the mine at the time of the accident and was held prisoner in the pumping machinery for half an hour. He managed to escape by using tools which he carried in his pockets. One lung was punctured and he suffered other injuries which caused complications.

M r. Stevens had been an employe of the Cleveland mine for some time and was well known in the community of Senecaville.  His widow and seven children survive. The body was removed to the Stevens morgue, prepared for burial and Thursday was taken to the home in Senecaville.

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The Jeffersonian, 1 Aug 1907 pg. 1 c. 3

Miner Has A Narrow Escape

Ray Stevens, a coal miner, employed at the Little Kate mine near Byesville, met with a very painful accident Monday night.  While at work in a room he was caught by a falloff slate and was cut and bruised about his head.  He heard the warning rumble as the coal and slate was falling and was thus able to get away from the danger, or otherwise might have been killed.

The injured man was taken to Dr. T. W. Long in Byesville, where he was attended to, and was able to leave this afternoon or hi home near Zanesville.

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The Jeffersonian, 19 July 1923 pg. 7 c. 2

Raymond Stiff

Raymond Stiff, age 18 years, of Byesville, injured by a fall of slate four weeks ago in Ideal mine of the Cambridge Collieries Company, died Thursday morning at 10 o’clock at the Cambridge hospital. Mr. Stiff was engaged in loading coal when the debris fell, striking him about the body and causing internal injuries. For some time his condition lad been regarded as critical, as complications developed. The body was removed to the home in Byesville.

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The Jeffersonian, 21 July 1923 pg. 2 c. 1

Funeral Notice

Funeral services for Raymond Stiff will be held Sunday at 2 o’clock at the residence by Rev. Cooper of Derwent.  Burial at Greenwood.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 13 Feb 1896 pg. 2 c. 6

Cumberland

Ellis Stockwell, a miner, who was injured by a fall of slate in the mine at Hartford last Tuesday, died on Friday morning. The remains were brought here for interment.  Funeral services were held Saturday from the M. E. Church, conducted by Rev. W. M. Anderson. The deceased was a brother of G. W. Stockwell of this place.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 13 Feb 1896 pg 3 c. 2

Ellis Stockwell, who was injured by a fall of slate in the Hartford mines died Thursday evening at 7 o’clock.  The funeral was held at Cumberland on Saturday where the body was interred.

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The Jeffersonian, 4 Feb 1916 pg. 5 c. 3

Miner Badly Bruised

Byesville, O., Feb. 4__John Stokoe, living on the Joseph Bruner farm, on the Senecaville road, and employed as a loader in the Buffalo mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co., was injured by a fall of coal Friday morning. His back was badly bruised and he was cut about the face. Dr. Paden was called.

Mr. Stokoe is singer and formerly lived in Byesville.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, Sep. 8, 1904 Pg. 3 C. 2

Miner Killed

Michael Sullivan, a well known young man living at Guernsey, east of the city, and who was employed as a driver at King’s mines, met with an accident Tuesday afternoon about 1:30 o’clock which resulted in his death half an hour later.

Shortly before the accident Mr. Sullivan sent a young man by the name of Dugan into the entry to bring up an empty mining car, and as it appeared he attempted to step on the front end, missing his footing and was thrown between the mule hauling the car and the front end of the car. The mule became frightened and started to run off dragging Sullivan some distance before it was stopped by some miners who had witnessed the accident. The wheels of the car passed over the back of his neck and he was injured about the body and legs.

The injured men was tenderly carried by his fellow working men to a house near the entrance of the mine, where he died about a half hour later.  Coroner Yeo was notified of the accident and ordered the remains to be taken to the home of the young man’s parents at Guernsey, which was done, the body being taken there on the B. & O. Labor train, and later the coroner went to the house to view the remains and take testimony.

Deceased was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Sullivan of Guernsey, and was their main support.  Besides the parents, one brother, Edward Sullivan of Guernsey, and a sister Mrs. Wm. Collins of West Gomber avenue, this city, are left to mourn his untimely death.  Mr. Sullivan was 33 years of age and until recently had been employed at the Klondyke mines. He was well known in this city.  The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon.

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The Jeffersonian, 10 Oct 1930 pg. 1 c. 8

Injuries Prove Fatal To Miner

Caught beneath a fall of slate at 4 o’clock Thursday afternoon in Harryette mine of the Akron Coal Co., Daniel Sziehay, 23, of Cambridge R. D. 4., received injuries which resulted in his death a few minutes after he was removed from the mine to await the arrival of an ambulance.

Fellow workmen heard the roar of the falling slate and worked frantically to rescue Sziehay.  They finally dug him from the debris and carried him to the mine opening where he died without regaining consciousness.  He sustained a broken neck, fractured skull, crushed chest and internal injuries.

The body was removed to Cambridge and was viewed by Coroner Robins. Sziehay is survived by his widow and one son, and his parents Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Sziehay, of Senecaville.

Funeral services will be conducted Monday morning at 10 o’clock and burial will be made at Mt. Zion cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday 16 Apr 1903, pg. 3, c. 3

James Tandy.

James Tandy, of Georgetown, aged about 62 years, died Monday evening April 13, 1903.  April 6th Mr. Tandy was injured by a fall of slate at Nicholson’s mines, and death came as a result of these injuries.

A wife, two brothers, and an adopted daughter are left to mourn.  The brothers are Wm. Tandy, of Georgetown, and Nimrod Tandy, of Zanesville.  Mrs. Annie Morgan, the daughter, resides near Moundsville, W. Va.

The deceased was a member of the Cambridge Post. G. A. R.  His regiment was the 26th O. V. V. I. , Company F.

The funeral will be held Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at the residence, services conducted by Rev. James Jones, assisted by other ministers.

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The Jeffersonian, 15 Mar 1930 pg. 1 c. 5

Miner is Killed In Harryette

Felix Tarry Sustains Fractured Skull In Accident Early Tuesday Evening.

Felix Tarry, aged about 43 years, of Red Town, a small settlement located between Harryette and Minnehaha mines, was almost instantly killed at 6 o’clock Tuesday evening in Harryette mine where he was employed as a trip rider.  He was riding a motor ahead of a cut of two cars, and it is believed he was either brushed off the motor or fell off as the mine train ran through a narrow entry.  He was found a few minutes after the accident by workmen.

His skull had been fractured, his right leg fractured in three places and his body was cut and bruised.  At first it was thought he had been knocked beneath the wheels of the mine cars and had been run over. No one witnessed the accident and the circumstances of how it occurred are not definitely known.

He apparently lived only a few minutes after the accident as he was pronounced dead by Dr. Taylor, who was summoned, before he was carried from the mine.  The body was removed to a Cambridge undertaking establishment.

Tarry is survived by his widow and nine children.  He had been employed as a miner in the Guernsey Valley for many years.

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Guernsey Times, 13 Nov 1918 pg. 1 c. 5

Miners Were Killed When Caught By Big Fall Of Slate

William Thacker, aged 60 years, and Herschel Hayburn, aged 40 years, were instantly killed by a fall of draw slate in the Banner mine of The Cambridge Collieries Co., Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Both men lived at Derwent, and had been employed, in the mine for many years. No particulars of the accident were known at the office of the company Tuesday night.  Coroner Lawyer was notified.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 21 Nov 1912 pg. 2 C. 3

Coal Miner is Badly Injured

Gene Thomas, aged 24 years, colored, a driver in the Puritan mine, of the Puritan Coal Co., was very badly hurt about his back, while working in the mine Monday morning.  He was placed on a street car and arriving here was taken to his home on East Wheeling Avenue, in Bair’s ambulance, where his injuries were dressed by Dr. A. G. Ringer.

Thomas was caught between the side of the car and a pile of slate.

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The Jeffersonian, 6 Mar 1917 pg. 1 c. 3

Miners Head Was Terrible Crushed

Byesville, March 6—George Thompson, aged 55 years was instantly killed by a fall of slate in the Puritan mine Tuesday morning at 8:33 o’clock.  The body was taken to the Conner undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

Mr. Thompson was employed as a loader in the mine and at the time of the accident was working some distance from the other men.  His head was terribly crushed, being almost severed from the body. He is survived by his wife and children, the family living in Derwent.

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The Jeffersonian, 7 May 1923 pg. 1 c. 1

Falls of Slate Kill Two Miners, Injure a Third

Victims Were Employed In Banner Mine

Accident occurred about 11:30 O’clock Sunday Morning

Pleasant City, May 7—Two miners were killed and another seriously injured Sunday morning at 11:30 o’clock by two falls of slate at Banner mine of the Cambridge Collieries Company.  Walter Thompson, 19, of Pleasant City and Ralph Ferrell, 34, of Derwent, were instantly killed and William Thompson, 22, a brother of Walter Thompson, was seriously crushed.

The three men had entered the mine but a short time before the accident to remove track from an entry where a squeeze had occurred.  The first fall of slate caught Walter Thompson and Ferrell, crushing them to death.  William Thompson was nearby at the time and narrowly escaped being caught by the first fall of debris.   He was grief stricken over the disaster and instantly started to work to remove the slate from his brother and Mr. Ferrell.

While engaged in his hopeless task the second fall of slate occurred, striking him about the body and limbs.  A Rescue party was quickly formed and the stone was removed from the men.

Walter Thompson and Ferrell were dead when taken from beneath this debris. William Thompson was hurried to the entrance of the mine where Dr. Wallenfeltz attended him.

He was then removed to the Herlan motor ambulance to the Cambridge

(Continued on Page Ten)

7 May 1923 pg. 10 c. 3

Fall of Slate Kill Two Miners

(Continued from Page One)

hospital where he was attended by Drs. Huth and Wallenfeltz.

William Thompson’s condition Monday morning was somewhat improved, giving rise to hope that he will recover.

The bodies of Thompson and Ferrell were taken from the mine, the former being removed to the Finley morgue and the latter to the Herland morgue.  Ferrell is survived by his wife and four children.

Walter Thompson leaves to mourn his death his father, William Thompson Sr., coal inspector for the Cambridge Collieries Company, one brother, William, and two sisters.  His mother is deceased. William Thompson is married and has one child.

The Thompson boys and Mr. Ferrell were well and favorably known in the vicinity of Pleasant City and Derwent and the horrible accident is deplored by all their friends.

Walter Thompson and Mr. Ferrell were crushed about their heads and upper parts of their bodies.

The funeral services for both victims of the accident will be held Wednesday, the services for Mr. Ferrell being held at 10 o’clock, in the Derwent Methodist Episcopal church, and interment will be made in Northwood cemetery, Cambridge.  Mr. Fertrell is survived by his widow, four children, his mother, four brothers and six sisters.

Services for Walter Thompson will be held in the Pleasant City Lutheran church in the afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, and interment will be made in the Pleasant City cemetery.

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The Jeffersonian, 30 Dec 1941 pg. 1 c. 4

Miner Fatally Hurt By Slate.

Andy Tomko, aged 50 Lore City, coal loader at Rigby mine of the Akron Coal Co., near Senecaville, was crushed to death in a slate fall Tuesday at 4:30 a. m. and two others, Frank Yentch, 30, Kipling, and Nick Antish, Lore City, were injured.

All three of the men were employed as loaders and were the only ones working in the room where the late fall occurred, according to officials of the company and D. W. A. Larrick, Guernsey county coroner, who investigated.

Tomko, whose body was examined at Herlan funeral home, Byesville, by Coroner Larrick, was believed to have been killed instantly as he was severely crushed through the chest and (Continued on Page Two.)

pg. 2 c. 8

Miner Fatally Hurt By Slate (Continued From Page One)

pelvis.  Both legs were fractured and his lower jaw was broken, the coroner said.

Only a small part of the slate struck Yentch, injuring him about the face, back and legs. Swan hospital attaches, where he was taken for treatment, said that an examination disclosed no broken bones and that his condition was satisfactory Tuesday at noon.  Antish’s injuries were only slight. He was able to go home.

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The Jeffersonian, 12 July 1916 pg. 4 c. 3

Fall Of Slate Killed Miner

John Tomshaw, age 35 years, was instantly killed in Black top mine, east of the city, Tuesday about 1:40 o’clock, when he was caught by a fall of slate. Mr. Tomshaw, who was employed as a loader, was horribly crushed; the slate weighing several tons, fell without warning, catching him across the chest. His partner, Edward Gorgovits, also narrowly escaped death by being crushed. So much slate fell upon the unfortunate man that it was only after several hours hard work that the body was removed.

Coroner W. M. Lawyer was notified and went to the mine Tuesday afternoon. The body was brought to the surface where he viewed it and ordered it prepared for burial. A number of witnesses have been instructed to appear at the inquest to be held Friday morning at 9 o’clock in the coroner’s office.  Mr. Tomshaw is survived by his wife and six small children.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 19 Jul 1906, Pg 5 C. 3

Crushed by Six Tons of Coal

Mike Tovt, a miner employed at the Hartford mine was covered by a heavy fall of coal, resulting from an explosion, early Saturday morning, and died soon afterward from the injuries.

With two other miners, Tovt was working a break-through, he was in one room, the other men on the opposite side in the other room, the men fired a shot without notifying Tovt and before he could get out of the way six tons of coal fell upon him.  He was still alive when rescued but, died soon after being removed to his boarding house.

Very little is known about the unfortunate man’s life, but his is supposed to be single as he has lived at a boarding house since going to Hartford.

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The Jeffersonian, 20 Sept 1924 pg. 1 c. 1

Fall Of Slate Proves Fatal

Edwin A. Treherne, 61, of Kings Mine, crushed by a fall of slate in Kings mine, of the Akron Coal company Friday afternoon, at 1:20 o’clock, died Friday night at 9 o’clock at the Wells hospital.  His left shoulder and chest were crushed and he was injured about the left side of his head.

Frank Treherne, a son of the deceased, was an eye witness to the fatal accident.  The father and son were employed as loaders in Kings mine and while at work in their room Friday afternoon the slate fell without warning.  Frank Treherne escaped from under the falling mass of rocks, which weighed about six tons, but his father was struck down.  The son assisted in removing the stone from his father’s body.

A preliminary examination disclosed that Mr. Treherne had suffered internal injuries and it was feared from the outset that he had

(Continued On Page Ten)

20 Sept 1924 pg. 10 c. 2

Fall Of Slate Proves Fatal

(Continued from Page One)

been fatally crushed.  The Stevens ambulance removed the injured man to the Wells hospital where attention was given.  The body was removed to the Stevens morgue and prepared for burial.

Funeral services will be conducted at the home by Rev. I. S. Evans, pastor of the First Presbyterian church, and interment will be made at Northwood cemetery.  The hour of the services had not been fixed.

Mr. Treherne had been a resident of Guernsey county for 25 years and was well and Favorably known.

In addition to his widow he leaves the following children: Mrs. Mathew Jackson and James and Allen Treherne, of Kings Mine; Mrs. Charles Touvell, of Lore City, and Mrs. John Touvell and Frank Treherne of Cambridge.  One son, Arthur Treherne is deceased.

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The Jeffersonian, 7 Sept 1932 pg. 1 c. 2

George Troyan Is Fatally Crushed In Walhonding Mine

George Troyan, 28, of Derwent, employed as driver in Walhonding mine of the Cambridge Collieries Co. was fatally crushed while at work Thursday afternoon.  Troyan was riding on a car of coal and fell.  He was crushed about the chest and hips and his skull was fractured.

Dr. McCormick, of Senecaville, gave first aid at the mine and the injured man was removed in the Herlan ambulance to the Litle Clinic at Byesville, where death ensued within 40 minutes.  He was conscious until a short time before death.

Mr. Troyan was a native of Guernsey county and had a wide circle of friends who were shocked by his tragic death.  He leaves his widow and two small children, in addition to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Troyan, of Pleasant City, and the following brothers and sisters: John Jr., Joseph; Peter and Pauline Troyan, all of Pleasant City, and Mrs. John Bare, of Cleveland.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Derwent M. E. church conducted by Rev. Cunningham of Buffalo. Interment will be made in Greenwood cemetery, Byesville.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 10 Nov 1904, pg. 3, c. 2

Miner Killed

James E. Unger, a coal miner employed at the Old Orchard Mine, while at work there that morning about 8 o’clock was caught by a fall of coal and instantly killed, the fall of coal breaking his neck. George Tucker, who was working with Mr. Unger at the time, was also caught by the coal but escaped without injury.

Deceased was about 37 years of age and leaves a wife and two children to mourn his death.

Coroner Yeo was notified of the accident and went out to the Old Orchard Mine to view the remains, after which they were taken to J. G. Bair’s undertaking establishment, on East Wheeling avenue and prepared for burial and then taken to the home of the deceased on 7th street, South Side.

Mr. Unger was a member of the Baptist church.

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The Jeffersonian, 21 Jun 1928 pg. 1 c. 6

Andy Valentine Died At The Wells Hospital Today

Burns Received Last Saturday Morning Proved Fatal To Miner

Was Victim of Powder Explosion

Was in Small Niche of The Wall When The Accident Occurred.

Andrew Valentine, aged 30, of West Steubenville avenue, died at Wells hospital Thursday morning at 1:53 o’clock as the result of burns received Saturday morning when a keg of powder exploded on the interior of Black Top Mine of the Morris Coal Co. Three others were burned in the explosion but are recovering.

According to the investigation conducted after the explosion by Mine Superintendent Morris K. Petty, Mr. Valentine was in the act of making a powder cartridge when a cutting machine was moved up beside him.  A half-keg of powder nearby suddenly exploded, igniting spark presumably coming either from the starter box or the cutting machine or from the  electric cable feeding the machine with current.

Mr. Valentine was in a small niche in the wall of the coal vein and was burned about the head, face, arms, neck and back and chest.  According to those who rescued him the clothes on the upper part of his body were burned almost to ashes. The explosion occurred about one mile from the main shaft.

Others burned were William Maley, 31, of Cutler, O., C. Guy Moss, Byesville, and W. H. Ryan, of near Cambridge. Ryan was dismissed from Wells hospital Monday, his burns being slight. Maley and Moss are still confined to their beds, but it is believed will recover.

Funeral services for Andrew Valentine will be held at the McMilen & Scott funeral parlors Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock and burial will be made at Northwood cemetery.

The deceased is survived by his father, Charles, of near Mineral Siding: his widow and two children Katherine and Arthur, of North Third street; four brothers, Charles, of Cambridge, Albert and Clarence of Wheeling, Thomas, of Akron; and one sister, Ida May Valentine of Detroit.

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Cambridge Jeffersonian, 21 Aug, 1902 pg. 1 c. 6

Powder Explodes

In Old Orchard Mine, Frightfully Burning Two Slavish Miners, Wednesday Afternoon.

Two Slavish miners employed at the Old Orchard Mines on the B. & O. railroad, east of the city, and shoes names were given as Vondrosak and Lestak, were very painfully burned by the explosion of a twenty-five pound can of powder while at work in the mines Wednesday afternoon about 3:30  o’clock. It is feared that the first names will die from the effects of his injuries, as he was so frightfully burned all over his body that at different places the flesh was literally cooked.

Lestak, the other man, was also burned about his body from the hips up, but his injuries are not so serious as are his companions and it is thought by the attending physicians, Dr. T. J. Harrison and Dr. F. M. Mitchell that he will recover.

At the time the two men had about completed their day’s work and were engaged in preparing a blast to be set off this morning. They had carried twenty-five pounds of powder into the room where they were working and it was while they were preparing what is known as the cartridge which sets the blasts off, that the explosion occurred. It is thought that while they were doing this that fire dropped from the lamps on their caps into the powder keg.  Other miners heard the sound of the explosion and ran to their assistance.

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The Jeffersonian, 9 Jan 1919 pg. 1 c. 3

Workman Dies From Injuries He Received

Charles Waddel, of Byesville, was so badly crushed by a fall of slate in the coal mine of the Nicholson Clay Product Company, Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock, that he died at his home about four hours later.

The unfortunate man had conducted a vulcanizing shop in Byesville until recently when he went to work for the Clay Products company.  He and his step-son Walter Rose, were at work in a room of the mine when the slate fell without warning crushing Mr. Waddel to the floor of the room.  His son escaped injury.

Workmen in the mine rescued the victim and brought him to the surface and he was removed to his home in Byesville.  He was badly crushed about the had and chest and one arm was badly mashed.

The deceased was about 45 years of age and is survived by his wife and several children.  He was well known in Byesville and at one time was the marshal of the town.

At the request of Coroner Bates, who is ill, Justice A. M. Baxter, of this city, went to Byesville to view the body and make arrangements for holding the inquest.

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Guernsey Times, 18 Jan 1919 pg. 7 c. 2

Charles R. Waddell

Charles R. Waddell, son of Mr. and Mars. Isaac Waddell, was born at Old Washing ton September, 1880, being 38 years, 11 months and 30 days of age at the time of his death.  He spent his entire life in and around Guernsey county. He was united in marriage to Miss Luella Jacksman in 1900, who preceded him to the great beyond September 26, 1905. To this union were born the following children: Mrs. Marie Walters, Clifford, Louise, all of this place.

He was again marriage to Mrs. Myrtle A. Rose November 28, 1917, who with the following children survive: Mrs. Marie Walters, Clifford, Louise and one stepson, Walter Rose, and also the following brothers and sisters: Bid Waddell of Hartford, and Mrs. Jet Walker of Cambridge.

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The Jeffersonian, 3 July 1913 pg. 5 c. 4

Miner Killed by Fall of Slate

Byesville, O., July 1—Joseph W. Walters, aged 50, of this city, was instantly killed late Monday afternoon, when caught by a fall of slate in the Puritan mine, near Byesville.

He was employed as a timberman and with another miner was placing props under some loose roofing when the mass let loose. He is survived by a wife and four children.

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Cambridge Jeffersonian, 30 Sept 1897 pg. 3 c. 2

Sam Warden, who is employed as a miner at the Nicholson mines east of the city, had his right hand very painfully injured Thursday. At the time of the accident he was putting a wedge in front of a car wheel in order to keep the car from moving when the wedge slipped and his hand was caught between the car and a post that was in the ground beside the rail. He was taken to Dr. Cain’s office where his injuries received attention.

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Cambridge Jeffersonian, 28 Nov 1907 pg. 3 c. 3

Miner Buried In Slack Pile

Fall of Coal Crushes John Wargo at the Guernsey Mines Wednesday

John Wargo, a miner employed in the Guernsey mines east of the city,, was caught by a fall of coal and slate Wednesday afternoon while at work and was badly crushed about the hips and limbs.

At the time of the accident he was standing on a pile of slack and when the heavy mass of coal and slate fell on him he was buried, thus saving him from more serious injury. The injured miner was taken to his home near the mine and a physician called.

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The Jeffersonian, 15 Sept 1924 pg. 1 c. 8

Injuries Prove Fatal To Miner

Crushed through the hips by a fall of coal while at work in Minnehaha mine of the National Coal company on Friday morning, Hiram Wickham, 52, of Dogtown, died from his injuries Sunday morning at 10:30 o’clock at his home. Mr. Wickham’s left hip was dislocated and he was severely bruised by the falling coal, but his condition was not considered serious and he was removed to his home.  Complications developed and death resulted.  He had been employed in the mines in Guernsey county for a number of years and was well and favorably known.

His widow, three sisters, Mrs. C. A. Dennis, of R. D. 6, Mrs. Thomas Davis, of Byesville, and Mrs. Martin Rayner, of Sarahsville; one brother, John Wickham, of Pleasant City R. D.; three half brothers Charles and Harry Rayner, of Ava and Clarence Rayner, of Claysville, and two half sisters, Mrs. Charles Norman and Mrs. Frank Norman, of Cambridge R. D., survive.

Funeral services will be conducted at the home Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock.  Interment will be made at Holley’s Ridge cemetery, near Ava.

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Cambridge Jeffersonian

30 Oct 1902 pg. 3 c. 7

Pleasant City

David Williams met with a fatal accident, Thursday while working in the Walhonding mines. While mining, coal fell on him and crushed him to death.  The funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday at 1 p.m., conducted by his pastor.  He was a member of the K. of P. and Foresters lodges, which attended in a body. He leaves a wife and three small children and a host of friends to mourn his death.

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The Jeffersonian, Thursday, 11 Jan 1912 pg. 4 c. 1

George Williams, a motorman in the Minnehaha mine of the National Coal Co., was very badly injured Tuesday morning. While running a number of cars into a room he was thrown from the motor, and caught between a post and the motor. His hips were crushed and he was otherwise injured about the body.  Dr. E. L. Lowthian was called and found the victim suffering incense pain but an examination showed that no bones were broken and unless he was injured internally or complications set in he will recover.

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Cambridge Herard, 17 Nov 1889 pg. 3 c. 4

Paul Williams, a miner of this place, was caught by a mass of falling coal in Nicholson’s mines, Thursday and sustained dangerous injuries. One leg was broken besides other hurts. Dr. Warne was called.

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The Jeffersonian, 6 Dec 1928 pg. 1 c. 8

Miner Killed By Fall Of Slate

Cleve Wiseman, aged about 35 years , of  Byesville, was fatally crushed by a fall of slate Thursday morning at Guernsey mine, operated by Harry Tickhill, where he was employed as a driver.  This was the first fatality in the Cambridge mine field since the mines reopened on May 1.

There were no witnesses to the accident, Wiseman’s body being found under the debris by Dode Beabout, a loader. His forehead was crushed, hips mashed and he sustained internal injuries.

Wiseman was gathering the cars of coal from the rooms in the mine and was walking along the entry when the rock fell, striking him about the body and pinning him to the ground. It is thought the accident occurred between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. Thursday, the body being found about two hours later.

Guernsey mine was abandoned some time ago and was later reopened for the mining of coal largely for domestic consumption.

Mr. Wiseman was an experienced miner, married and head three children.

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